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writing

[rahy-ting] /ˈraɪ tɪŋ/
noun
1.
the act of a person or thing that writes.
2.
written form:
to commit one's thoughts to writing.
3.
that which is written; characters or matter written with a pen or the like:
His writing is illegible.
4.
such characters or matter with respect to style, kind, quality, etc.
5.
an inscription.
6.
a letter.
7.
any written or printed paper, as a document or deed.
8.
literary or musical style, form, quality, technique, etc.:
Her writing is stilted.
9.
a literary composition or production.
10.
the profession of a writer:
He turned to writing at an early age.
11.
the Writings, Hagiographa.
Idioms
12.
writing on the wall. handwriting (def 4).
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English; see write, -ing1
Related forms
self-writing, adjective
unwriting, adjective

Hagiographa

[hag-ee-og-ruh-fuh, hey-jee-] /ˌhæg iˈɒg rə fə, ˌheɪ dʒi-/
noun, (used with a singular verb)
1.
the third of the three Jewish divisions of the Old Testament, variously arranged, but usually comprising the Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles.
Also called the Writings.
Origin
< Late Latin < Greek: sacred writings, equivalent to hagio- hagio- + -grapha, neuter plural of -graphos -graph
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for writings
  • The description of a new world called the blazing world and other writings.
  • His work at the detective agency provided him the inspiration for his writings.
British Dictionary definitions for writings

Writings

/ˈraɪtɪŋz/
plural noun
1.
the Writings, another term for the Hagiographa

Hagiographa

/ˌhæɡɪˈɒɡrəfə/
noun
1.
the third of the three main parts into which the books of the Old Testament are divided in Jewish tradition (the other two parts being the Law and the Prophets), comprising Psalms, Proverbs, Job, the Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles Also called Writings

writing

/ˈraɪtɪŋ/
noun
1.
a group of letters or symbols written or marked on a surface as a means of communicating ideas by making each symbol stand for an idea, concept, or thing, by using each symbol to represent a set of sounds grouped into syllables (syllabic writing), or by regarding each symbol as corresponding roughly or exactly to each of the sounds in the language (alphabetic writing) See also ideogram
2.
short for handwriting
3.
anything expressed in letters, esp a literary composition
4.
the work of a writer
5.
literary style, art, or practice
6.
written form: give it to me in writing
7.
(modifier) related to or used in writing: writing ink
8.
writing on the wall, a sign or signs of approaching disaster
Word Origin
sense 8: allusion to Daniel 5:5
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for writings

writing

n.

"system of human intercommunication by means of conventional visible marks," c.1300, "written characters; words, sentences," verbal noun from write (v.). From late 14c. as "action of composing in characters; craft of writing; one's own handwriting."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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writings in the Bible

the holy writings, a term which came early into use in the Christian church to denote the third division of the Old Testament scriptures, called by the Jews Kethubim, i.e., "Writings." It consisted of five books, viz., Job, Proverbs, and Psalms, and the two books of Chronicles. The ancient Jews classified their sacred books as the Law, the Prophets, and the Kethubim, or Writings. (See BIBLE.) In the New Testament (Luke 24:44) we find three corresponding divisions, viz., the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms.


The art of writing must have been known in the time of the early Pharaohs. Moses is commanded "to write for a memorial in a book" (Ex. 17:14) a record of the attack of Amalek. Frequent mention is afterwards made of writing (28:11, 21, 29, 36; 31:18; 32:15, 16; 34:1, 28; 39:6, 14, 30). The origin of this art is unknown, but there is reason to conclude that in the age of Moses it was well known. The inspired books of Moses are the most ancient extant writings, although there are written monuments as old as about B.C. 2000. The words expressive of "writing," "book," and "ink," are common to all the branches or dialects of the Semitic language, and hence it has been concluded that this art must have been known to the earliest Semites before they separated into their various tribes, and nations, and families. "The Old Testament and the discoveries of Oriental archaeology alike tell us that the age of the Exodus was throughout the world of Western Asia an age of literature and books, of readers and writers, and that the cities of Palestine were stored with the contemporaneous records of past events inscribed on imperishable clay. They further tell us that the kinsfolk and neighbours of the Israelites were already acquainted with alphabetic writing, that the wanderers in the desert and the tribes of Edom were in contact with the cultured scribes and traders of Ma'in [Southern Arabia], and that the 'house of bondage' from which Israel had escaped was a land where the art of writing was blazoned not only on the temples of the gods, but also on the dwellings of the rich and powerful.", Sayce. (See DEBIR ØT0000995; PHOENICIA.) The "Book of the Dead" was a collection of prayers and formulae, by the use of which the souls of the dead were supposed to attain to rest and peace in the next world. It was composed at various periods from the earliest time to the Persian conquest. It affords an interesting glimpse into the religious life and system of belief among the ancient Egyptians. We learn from it that they believed in the existence of one Supreme Being, the immortality of the soul, judgement after death, and the resurrection of the body. It shows, too, a high state of literary activity in Egypt in the time of Moses. It refers to extensive libraries then existing. That of Ramessium, in Thebes, e.g., built by Rameses II., contained 20,000 books. When the Hebrews entered Canaan it is evident that the art of writing was known to the original inhabitants, as appears, e.g., from the name of the city Debir having been at first Kirjath-sepher, i.e., the "city of the book," or the "book town" (Josh. 10:38; 15:15; Judg. 1:11). The first mention of letter-writing is in the time of David (2 Sam. 11:14, 15). Letters are afterwards frequently spoken of (1 Kings 21:8, 9, 11; 2 Kings 10:1, 3, 6, 7; 19:14; 2 Chr. 21:12-15; 30:1, 6-9, etc.).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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