-gram

-gram

1
a combining form occurring in loanwords from Greek, where it meant “something written,” “drawing” (epigram; diagram ); on this model, used in the formation of compound words (oscillogram ).
Compare -graph.


Origin:
< Greek -gramma, combining form of grámma something written or drawn; akin to carve

Dictionary.com Unabridged

-gram

2
a combining form of gram1: kilogram.

-gram

3
a combining form extracted from telegram, used in the formation of compound words that have the general sense “message, bulletin”: culturegram; electiongram; prophecy-gram.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
-gram
 
n combining form
indicating a drawing or something written or recorded: hexagram; telegram
 
[from Latin -gramma, from Greek, from gramma letter and grammē line]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

-gram
suffix from telegram (1857), first abstracted 1979 (in Gorillagram, a proprietary name in U.S.), and put to wide use in forming new words, such as stripagram (1981). The construction violates Gk. grammar, as an adv. could not properly form part of a compound noun.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

-gram suff.
Something written or drawn; a record: cardiogram.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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