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accentuate

[ak-sen-choo-eyt] /ækˈsɛn tʃuˌeɪt/
verb (used with object), accentuated, accentuating.
1.
to give emphasis or prominence to.
2.
to mark or pronounce with an accent.
Origin
1725-1735
1725-35; < Medieval Latin accentuātus intoned (past participle of accentuāre). See accent, -ate1
Related forms
overaccentuate, verb (used with object), overaccentuated, overaccentuating.
reaccentuate, verb (used with object), reaccentuated, reaccentuating.
unaccentuated, adjective
well-accentuated, adjective
Can be confused
accent, accentuate, assent.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for accentuated
  • Falling prices are accentuated in illiquid markets such as residential property.
  • Henry had a startled face that was accentuated by his ears.
  • Belated acknowledgment only accentuated the bunkum that preceded it.
  • And that problem is accentuated by the fact that people are wary of taking action too quickly.
  • In others, the ridge patterns in the fingerprint were accentuated and the parchment all but faded away.
  • Fusing this tragedy to all the others accentuated its historic resonance.
  • The patterns extended from the helmet to the shoulders, and some players accentuated them with similarly styled armbands.
  • Greenspan's policies of low interest rates accentuated it.
  • The powerful lights flooded the railroad yards in a brilliant glare that accentuated the pitchy blackness of shadows.
British Dictionary definitions for accentuated

accentuate

/ækˈsɛntʃʊˌeɪt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to stress or emphasize
Derived Forms
accentuation, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for accentuated

accentuate

v.

1731, from Medieval Latin accentuatus, past participle of accentuare "to accent," from Latin accentus (see accent (n.)). Originally "to pronounce with an accent;" meaning "emphasize" is recorded from 1865.

You've got to accentuate the positive
Eliminate the negative
Latch on to the affirmative
Don't mess with Mister In-Between

["Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive," 1944, music by Harold Arlen, lyrics by Johnny Mercer]
Related: Accentuated; accentuating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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