child

[chahyld]
noun, plural children.
1.
a person between birth and full growth; a boy or girl: books for children.
2.
a son or daughter: All my children are married.
3.
a baby or infant.
4.
a human fetus.
5.
a childish person: He's such a child about money.
6.
a descendant: a child of an ancient breed.
7.
any person or thing regarded as the product or result of particular agencies, influences, etc.: Abstract art is a child of the 20th century.
8.
a person regarded as conditioned or marked by a given circumstance, situation, etc.: a child of poverty; a child of famine.
9.
British Dialect Archaic. a female infant.
10.
Archaic. childe.
Idioms
11.
with child, pregnant: She's with child.

Origin:
before 950; Middle English; Old English cild; akin to Gothic kilthai womb

childless, adjective
childlessness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Child

[chahyld]
noun
1.
Julia, 1912–2004, U.S. gourmet cook, author, and television personality.
2.
Lydia Maria (Francis) 1802–80, U.S. author, abolitionist, and social reformer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
child (tʃaɪld)
 
n , pl children
1.  a.  a boy or girl between birth and puberty
 b.  (as modifier): child labour
2.  a baby or infant
3.  an unborn babyRelated: paedo-
4.  with child another term for pregnant
5.  a human offspring; a son or daughterRelated: filial
6.  a childish or immature person
7.  a member of a family or tribe; descendant: a child of Israel
8.  a person or thing regarded as the product of an influence or environment: a child of nature
9.  dialect (Midland English), (Western English) a female infant
 
Related: paedo-, filial
 
[Old English cild; related to Gothic kilthei womb, Sanskrit jathara belly, jartu womb]
 
'childless
 
adj
 
'childlessness
 
n
 
'childly
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

child
O.E. cild "child," from P.Gmc. *kiltham (source of Gothic kilþei "womb"), unrelated to other languages. Also in O.E. meaning "a youth of gentle birth" (archaic, usually written childe). In 16c., especially "girl child." The difficulty with the plural began in O.E., where the nom. pl. was at first
cild, identical with the sing., then c.975 pl. form cildru (gen. cildra) arose, only to be re-pluraled c.1175 as children, which is thus a double plural. M.E. plural cildre survives in Lancashire dialect childer and in Childermas (c.1000) "festival of the Holy Innocents" (Dec. 28).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

child (chīld)
n.

  1. A person between birth and puberty.

  2. An unborn infant; a fetus.

  3. An infant; a baby.

  4. One who is childish or immature.

  5. A son or daughter; an offspring.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

child definition


daughter

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Child definition


This word has considerable latitude of meaning in Scripture. Thus Joseph is called a child at the time when he was probably about sixteen years of age (Gen. 37:3); and Benjamin is so called when he was above thirty years (44:20). Solomon called himself a little child when he came to the kingdom (1 Kings 3:7). The descendants of a man, however remote, are called his children; as, "the children of Edom," "the children of Moab," "the children of Israel." In the earliest times mothers did not wean their children till they were from thirty months to three years old; and the day on which they were weaned was kept as a festival day (Gen. 21:8; Ex. 2:7, 9; 1 Sam. 1:22-24; Matt. 21:16). At the age of five, children began to learn the arts and duties of life under the care of their fathers (Deut. 6:20-25; 11:19). To have a numerous family was regarded as a mark of divine favour (Gen. 11:30; 30:1; 1 Sam. 2:5; 2 Sam. 6:23; Ps. 127:3; 128:3). Figuratively the name is used for those who are ignorant or narrow-minded (Matt. 11:16; Luke 7:32; 1 Cor. 13:11). "When I was a child, I spake as a child." "Brethren, be not children in understanding" (1 Cor. 14:20). "That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro" (Eph. 4:14). Children are also spoken of as representing simplicity and humility (Matt. 19:13-15; Mark 10:13-16; Luke 18:15-17). Believers are "children of light" (Luke 16:8; 1 Thess. 5:5) and "children of obedience" (1 Pet. 1:14).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

child

In addition to the idiom beginning with child, also see second childhood.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences for Child
Despite this, he was considered a wellmannered and quiet child.
It was suggested as recommended reading when debbie wanted a child.
Born prematurely, johannes claimed to have been a weak and sickly child.
The birth of a child is cause for special musical celebration.
Idioms & Phrases
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