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chin

[chin] /tʃɪn/
noun
1.
the lower extremity of the face, below the mouth.
2.
the prominence of the lower jaw.
3.
Informal. chin-up.
verb (used with object), chinned, chinning.
4.
Gymnastics.
  1. to bring one's chin up to (a horizontal bar, from which one is hanging by the hands), by bending the elbows.
  2. to raise (oneself) to this position.
5.
to raise or hold to the chin, as a violin.
6.
Archaic. to talk to; chatter with.
verb (used without object), chinned, chinning.
7.
Gymnastics. to chin oneself.
8.
Slang. to talk; chatter:
We sat up all night chinning about our college days.
Idioms
9.
keep one's chin up, to maintain a cheerful disposition in spite of difficulties, disappointments, etc.
Also, chin up.
10.
take it on the chin, Informal.
  1. to suffer defeat; fail completely.
  2. to endure suffering or punishment.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English; Old English cin(n); cognate with Dutch kin, German Kinn chin, Old Norse kinn, Gothic kinnus cheek, Latin gena, Greek génus chin, gnáthos jaw (see genial2, -gnathous), Sanskrit hanus jaw
Related forms
chinless, adjective
underchin, noun

Chin

[jin] /dʒɪn/
noun
1.
Also, Tsin. any of three dynasties that ruled in China, a.d. 265–316 (the Western Chin), a.d. 317–420 (the Eastern Chin), and a.d. 936–46 (the Later Chin).
2.
a dynasty that ruled in China 1115–1234.
Also, Jin.

ch'in

[chin; Chinese cheen] /tʃɪn; Chinese tʃin/
noun
1.
a Chinese zither consisting of an oblong, slightly curved wooden box over which are stretched strings that are stopped with one hand and plucked with the other.
Origin
< Chinese (Wade-Giles) ch'in2, (Pinyin) qín

Ch'in

[chin; Chinese cheen] /tʃɪn; Chinese tʃin/
noun
1.
a dynasty in ancient China, 221–206 b.c., marked by the emergence of a unified empire and the construction of much of the Great Wall of China.
Also, Qin.

Chin.

1.
2.
Also, Chin.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for chin
  • His features are delicate and refined, leaning to weakness in the mouth and chin.
  • Lingonberry juice had stained an enormous crimson patch around my mouth and down onto my chin and neck.
  • He has a prominent forehead and a fine mouth and chin.
  • The mouth is too high for the bottom of the mesa to be the chin.
  • Its down was fuzzy against my chin, and its new feathers tickled the side of my neck.
  • Flustered, he stands up on pointed toes, raises his chin and arrogantly flourishes his hand in the air.
  • Following tradition, her chin was tattooed with four lines.
  • Having had his jaw broken in the persecution, he wore a bandage under his chin to support it.
  • There have always been recurring cycles of undress, followed by muffling from shoe-soles to chin.
  • He had a smile that thrust out his chin as if it were dislocated.
British Dictionary definitions for chin

chin

/tʃɪn/
noun
1.
the protruding part of the lower jaw
2.
the front part of the face below the lips related adjective genial
3.
keep one's chin up, to keep cheerful under difficult circumstances Sometimes shortened to chin up!
4.
(informal) take it on the chin, to face squarely up to a defeat, adversity, etc
verb chins, chinning, chinned
5.
(gymnastics) to raise one's chin to (a horizontal bar, etc) when hanging by the arms
6.
(transitive) (informal) to punch or hit (someone) on the chin
Word Origin
Old English cinn; related to Old Norse kinn, Old High German kinni, Latin gena cheek, Old Irish gin mouth, Sanskrit hanu

Chin.

abbreviation
1.
China
2.
Chinese
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for chin
n.

Old English cin, cinn "chin" (but in some compounds suggesting an older, broader sense of "jawbone"); a general Germanic word (cf. Old Saxon and Old High German kinni; Old Norse kinn; German Kinn "chin;" Gothic kinnus "cheek"), from PIE root *genu- "chin, jawbone" (cf. Sanskrit hanuh, Avestan zanu- "chin;" Armenian cnawt "jawbone, cheek;" Lithuanian žándas "jawbone;" Greek genus "lower jaw," geneion "chin;" Old Irish gin "mouth," Welsh gen "jawbone, chin").

v.

1590s, "to press (affectionately) chin to chin," from chin (n.). Meaning "to bring to the chin" (of a fiddle) is from 1869. Slang meaning "talk, gossip" is from 1883, American English. Related: Chinned; chinning. Athletic sense of "raise one's chin over" (a raised bar, for exercise) is from 1880s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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chin in Medicine

chin (chĭn)
n.
The prominence formed by the anterior projection of the lower jaw.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Slang definitions & phrases for chin

chin

noun

A talk; a chat (1890s+)

verb
  1. To talk; converse: happily chinning in the corner (1870s+)
  2. To talk to: The cop was chinning a nurse (1880s+)
Related Terms

take it on the chin, wag one's chin


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Related Abbreviations for chin

CHIN

  1. Children's Health Information Network
  2. Community Health Information Network

Chin.

Chinese
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Idioms and Phrases with chin
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for chin

ch'in

fretless Chinese board zither with seven strings. Traditionally the body of the qin was of a length that represented the 365 days of the year (3 chi [a chi is a Chinese foot], 6 cun [a cun is a Chinese inch, one-tenth of a chi], and 5 fen [a fen is one-tenth of a Chinese inch] long). The qin is usually lacquered and is inlaid with 13 dots (hui) of ivory, jade, or mother-of-pearl that indicate pitch positions, primarily on the upper melodic string. The silk strings, which are of graduated thickness, are tuned pentatonically, and the thickest string is farthest from the player's body. They are stretched over a narrow and slightly convex sound board, usually made of paulownia wood (Sterculia plantanifolia); the underside of the sound board is closed by a flat base, usually made of zi (Chinese catalpa, Catalpa kaempferi). The underside of the base has two sound holes, the larger of which is called the "dragon pond" (longchi), and the smaller of which is called the "phoenix pool" (fengzhao). The qin's high bridge near the wide end of the soundboard is called the "great mountain" (yueshan), the low bridge at the narrow end is called the "dragon's gums" (longyin), and the two pegs for fastening the strings are called the "goose feet" (yanzhu). Each qin is given a unique name, which is engraved on the back side of the instrument, along with poems and the owner's (or owners') seals

Learn more about ch'in with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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9
10
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