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collect1

[kuh-lekt] /kəˈlɛkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to gather together; assemble:
The professor collected the students' exams.
2.
to accumulate; make a collection of:
to collect stamps.
3.
to receive or compel payment of:
to collect a bill.
4.
to regain control of (oneself or one's thoughts, faculties, composure, or the like):
At the news of her promotion, she took a few minutes to collect herself.
5.
to call for and take with one:
He drove off to collect his guests. They collected their mail.
6.
Manège. to bring (a horse) into a collected attitude.
7.
Archaic. to infer.
verb (used without object)
8.
to gather together; assemble:
The students collected in the assembly hall.
9.
to accumulate:
Rain water collected in the barrel.
10.
to receive payment (often followed by on):
He collected on the damage to his house.
11.
to gather or bring together books, stamps, coins, etc., usually as a hobby:
He's been collecting for years.
12.
Manège. (of a horse) to come into a collected attitude.
adjective, adverb
13.
requiring payment by the recipient:
a collect telephone call; a telegram sent collect.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin collēctus (past participle of colligere to collect), equivalent to col- col-1 + leg- (stem of legere to gather) + -tus past participle suffix
Synonyms
1. See gather. 1, 2. amass, aggregate. 4. compose, calm.
Antonyms
1. broadcast. 2. distribute.

collect2

[kol-ekt] /ˈkɒl ɛkt/
noun
1.
any of certain brief prayers used in Western churches especially before the epistle in the communion service.
Origin
1150-1200; Middle English collecte < Medieval Latin, short for ōrātiō ad collēctam prayer at collection (see collect1)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for collect
  • Anybody could run wires to a few hundred houses, beam programmes and collect money.
  • The better you dance, the more money you'll collect from your patrons.
  • The functionaries who collect and spend money are not office-holders, but public-servants.
  • If you collect doodads, you'll be given more money with which to upgrade your units.
  • Beneficiaries collect their money from the bank through electronic cards.
  • She ventured into the poker room to collect her friend, who was losing money.
  • Remember, the court cannot collect the money for you.
  • Roofs collect a lot of nitrogen from contaminants in the air.
  • But a group of the traditional snake rustlers has formed a cooperative to collect venom and protect their way of life.
  • He's old enough to collect social security, yet he appears stronger and more hip than ever.
British Dictionary definitions for collect

collect1

/kəˈlɛkt/
verb
1.
to gather together or be gathered together
2.
to accumulate (stamps, books, etc) as a hobby or for study
3.
(transitive) to call for or receive payment of (taxes, dues, etc)
4.
(transitive) to regain control of (oneself, one's emotions, etc) as after a shock or surprise: he collected his wits
5.
(transitive) to fetch; pick up: collect your own post, he collected the children after school
6.
(slang) (intransitive) sometimes foll by on. to receive large sums of money, as from an investment: he really collected when the will was read
7.
(transitive) (Austral & NZ, informal) to collide with; be hit by
8.
collect on delivery, the US term for cash on delivery
adverb, adjective
9.
(US) (of telephone calls) on a reverse-charge basis
noun
10.
(Austral, informal) a winning bet
Word Origin
C16: from Latin collēctus collected, from colligere to gather together, from com- together + legere to gather

collect2

/ˈkɒlɛkt/
noun
1.
(Christianity) a short Church prayer generally preceding the lesson or epistle in Communion and other services
Word Origin
C13: from Medieval Latin collecta (from the phrase ōrātiō ad collēctam prayer at the (people's) assembly), from Latin colligere to collect1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for collect
v.

early 15c. (transitive), from Old French collecter "to collect" (late 14c.), from Latin collectus, past participle of colligere "gather together," from com- "together" (see com-) + legere "to gather" (see lecture (n.)). The intransitive sense is attested from 1794. Related: Collected; collecting. As an adjective meaning "paid by the recipient" it is attested from 1893, originally with reference to telegrams.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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