commence

[kuh-mens]
verb (used without object), verb (used with object), commenced, commencing.
to begin; start.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English commencen < Anglo-French, Middle French comencer < Vulgar Latin *cominitiāre, equivalent to Latin com- com- + initiāre to begin; see initiate

commenceable, adjective
commencer, noun
recommence, verb, recommenced, recommencing.
uncommenced, adjective
well-commenced, adjective


originate, inaugurate. See begin.
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World English Dictionary
commence (kəˈmɛns)
 
vb
to start or begin; come or cause to come into being, operation, etc
 
[C14: from Old French comencer, from Vulgar Latin cominitiāre (unattested), from Latin com- (intensive) + initiāre to begin, from initium a beginning]
 
com'mencer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

commence
early 14c., from O.Fr. comencier, from V.L. *cominitiare, orig. "to initiate as priest, consecrate," from L. com- "together" + initiare "to initiate."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Mortgages were easier to obtain than before, and a building boom commenced.
Of course, we'll have cold snaps in the future, after we've commenced with out sulfur dioxide injections into the stratosphere.
The horses, startled by the noise, commenced plunging furiously.
Up to the present writing, the crew have not commenced to row.
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