consolidated

[kuhn-sol-i-dey-tid]
adjective
1.
brought together into a single whole.
2.
having become solid, firm, or coherent.
3.
Accounting. taking into account the combined information gathered from the financial conditions of a parent corporation and its subsidiaries: a consolidated balance sheet.

Origin:
1745–55; consolidate + -ed2

quasi-consolidated, adjective
unconsolidated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

consolidate

[kuhn-sol-i-deyt]
verb (used with object), consolidated, consolidating.
1.
to bring together (separate parts) into a single or unified whole; unite; combine: They consolidated their three companies.
2.
to discard the unused or unwanted items of and organize the remaining: She consolidated her home library.
3.
to make solid or firm; solidify; strengthen: to consolidate gains.
4.
Military. to strengthen by rearranging the position of ground combat troops after a successful attack.
verb (used without object), consolidated, consolidating.
5.
to unite or combine.
6.
to become solid or firm.
adjective
7.
consolidated ( def 2 ).

Origin:
1505–15; < Latin consolidātus (past participle of consolidāre), equivalent to con- con- + solid(us) solid + -ātus -ate1

consolidator, noun
preconsolidate, verb, preconsolidated, preconsolidating.
reconsolidate, verb, reconsolidated, reconsolidating.
unconsolidating, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
consolidate (kənˈsɒlɪˌdeɪt)
 
vb
1.  to form or cause to form into a solid mass or whole; unite or be united
2.  to make or become stronger or more stable
3.  military to strengthen or improve one's control over (a situation, force, newly captured area, etc)
 
[C16: from Latin consolidāre to make firm, from solidus strong, solid]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

consolidate
1510s, "to compact into one body," from L. consolidat-, pp. stem of consolidare, from con- "together" + solidare "to make solid" (see consolidation). Meaning "to make firm or strong" is from c.1540. Related: Consolidating (1660s).

consolidated
pp. adj. from consolidate. Of money, debt, etc., from 1753; in lit. sense of "made firm, unified," from c.1850.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The original answer was a consolidated marketplace and a single trading
  platform.
Those unconscious memories don't rely on the hippocampal region to be
  consolidated and stored.
Recently, the newly consolidated storm has been taking on its predecessor's
  reddish-brown hue.
Convenient and quality amenities include a consolidated rental car facility to
  help you get to your preferred destination.
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