cormorant

[kawr-mer-uhnt]
noun
1.
any of several voracious, totipalmate seabirds of the family Phalacrocoracidae, as Phalacrocorax carbo, of America, Europe, and Asia, having a long neck and a distensible pouch under the bill for holding captured fish, used in China for catching fish.
2.
a greedy person.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English cormera(u)nt < Middle French cormorant, Old French cormareng < Late Latin corvus marīnus sea-raven. See corbel, marine

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Collins
World English Dictionary
cormorant (ˈkɔːmərənt)
 
n
any aquatic bird of the family Phalacrocoracidae, of coastal and inland waters, having a dark plumage, a long neck and body, and a slender hooked beak: order Pelecaniformes (pelicans, etc)
 
[C13: from Old French cormareng, from corp raven, from Latin corvus + -mareng of the sea, from Latin mare sea]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cormorant
early 14c., from O.Fr. cormareng, from L.L. corvus marinus "sea raven." It has a reputation for voracity.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Cormorant definition


(Lev. 11:17; Deut. 14:17), Heb. shalak, "plunging," or "darting down," (the Phalacrocorax carbo), ranked among the "unclean" birds; of the same family group as the pelican. It is a "plunging" bird, and is common on the coasts and the island seas of Palestine. Some think the Hebrew word should be rendered "gannet" (Sula bassana, "the solan goose"); others that it is the "tern" or "sea swallow," which also frequents the coasts of Palestine as well as the Sea of Galilee and the Jordan valley during several months of the year. But there is no reason to depart from the ordinary rendering. In Isa. 34:11, Zeph. 2:14 (but in R.V., "pelican") the Hebrew word rendered by this name is _ka'ath_. It is translated "pelican" (q.v.) in Ps. 102:6. The word literally means the "vomiter," and the pelican is so called from its vomiting the shells and other things which it has voraciously swallowed. (See PELICAN.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Angry fishermen accuse the cormorant of ruining their livelihood and have taken the law into their own hands.
The first bird was a double-crested cormorant, not a crested cormorant.
One of the pieces is the oldest known representation of a bird, which resembles a cormorant or a duck.
Effects of management on double-crested cormorant nesting colony fidelity.
Images for Cormorant
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