disillusion

[dis-i-loo-zhuhn]
verb (used with object)
1.
to free from or deprive of illusion, belief, idealism, etc.; disenchant.
noun
2.
a freeing or a being freed from illusion or conviction; disenchantment.

Origin:
1590–1600; dis-1 + illusion

disillusionment, noun
disillusive [dis-i-loo-siv] , adjective
undisillusioned, adjective


1. disabuse, disenthrall, undeceive, disappoint.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
disillusion (ˌdɪsɪˈluːʒən)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to destroy the ideals, illusions, or false ideas of
 
n
2.  the act of disillusioning or the state of being disillusioned

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disillusion
"to free or be freed from illusion," 1851, from dis- + illusion (q.v.). Related: Disillusioned; disillusionment.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It will be an educational test: an ordeal of frustration and disillusionment.
But they also invite disappointment and disillusionment when the goals are
  missed.
One can't mend years of disillusionment with government and science over night.
Disillusionment with that decision led many evangelicals to withdraw from
  direct engagement in politics.
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