dragon

[drag-uhn]
noun
1.
a mythical monster generally represented as a huge, winged reptile with crested head and enormous claws and teeth, and often spouting fire.
2.
Archaic. a huge serpent or snake.
3.
Bible. a large animal, possibly a large snake or crocodile.
4.
the dragon, Satan.
5.
a fierce, violent person.
6.
a very watchful and strict woman.
8.
Botany. any of several araceous plants, as Arisaema dracontium (green dragon or dragonroot) the flowers of which have a long, slender spadix and a green, shorter spathe.
9.
a short musket carried by a mounted infantryman in the 16th and 17th centuries.
10.
a soldier armed with such a musket.
11.
(initial capital letter) Astronomy. the constellation Draco.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin dracōn- (stem of dracō) < Greek drákōn kind of serpent, probably orig. epithet, the (sharp-)sighted one, akin to dérkesthai to look

dragonish, adjective
dragonlike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
dragon (ˈdræɡən)
 
n
1.  a mythical monster usually represented as breathing fire and having a scaly reptilian body, wings, claws, and a long tail
2.  informal a fierce or intractable person, esp a woman
3.  any of various very large lizards, esp the Komodo dragon
4.  any of various North American aroid plants, esp the green dragon
5.  Christianity a manifestation of Satan or an attendant devil
6.  a yacht of the International Dragon Class, 8.88m long (29.2 feet), used in racing
7.  slang chase the dragon to smoke opium or heroin
 
[C13: from Old French, from Latin dracō, from Greek drakōn; related to drakos eye]
 
'dragoness
 
fem n
 
'dragonish
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dragon
early 13c., from O.Fr. dragon, from L. draconem (nom. draco) "serpent, dragon," from Gk. drakon (gen. drakontos) "serpent, seafish," from drak-, strong aorist stem of derkesthai "to see clearly." But perhaps the lit. sense is "the one with the (deadly) glance." The young are dragonets (14c.). Obsolete
drake "dragon" is an older borrowing of the same word. Used in the Bible to translate Heb. tannin "a great sea-monster," and tan, a desert mammal now believed to be the jackal.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

DRAGON definition


1. An Esprit project aimed at providing effective support to reuse in real-time distributed Ada application programs.
2. An implementation language used by BTI Computer Systems.
E-mail: Pat Helland .
[Jargon File]
(1994-12-08)

dragon definition


[MIT] A program similar to a daemon, except that it is not invoked at all, but is instead used by the system to perform various secondary tasks. A typical example would be an accounting program, which keeps track of who is logged in, accumulates load-average statistics, etc. Under ITS, many terminals displayed a list of people logged in, where they were, what they were running, etc., along with some random picture (such as a unicorn, Snoopy or the Enterprise), which was generated by the "name dragon". Use is rare outside MIT, under Unix and most other operating systems this would be called a "background demon" or daemon. The best-known Unix example of a dragon is cron. At SAIL, they called this sort of thing a "phantom".
[Jargon File]

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Dragon definition


(1.) Heb. tannim, plural of tan. The name of some unknown creature inhabiting desert places and ruins (Job 30:29; Ps. 44:19; Isa. 13:22; 34:13; 43:20; Jer. 10:22; Micah 1:8; Mal. 1:3); probably, as translated in the Revised Version, the jackal (q.v.). (2.) Heb. tannin. Some great sea monster (Jer. 51:34). In Isa. 51:9 it may denote the crocodile. In Gen. 1:21 (Heb. plural tanninim) the Authorized Version renders "whales," and the Revised Version "sea monsters." It is rendered "serpent" in Ex. 7:9. It is used figuratively in Ps. 74:13; Ezek. 29:3. In the New Testament the word "dragon" is found only in Rev. 12:3, 4, 7, 9, 16, 17, etc., and is there used metaphorically of "Satan." (See WHALE.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
The image, in dungeon-and-dragon style, is daunting.
Sorry, dragon, as a whole art historians are a pretty frumpy lot.
But others were wary of the steam engine, which was frequently caricatured as a
  fiery dragon.
The first player is the dragon head and the last the tail.
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