gerundive

[juh-ruhn-div]
noun
1.
(in Latin) a verbal adjective similar to the gerund in form and noting the obligation, necessity, or worthiness of the action to be done, as legendus in Liber legendus est, “The book is worth reading.”
adjective
2.
resembling a gerund.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin gerundīvus. See gerund, -ive

gerundival [jer-uhn-dahy-vuhl] , adjective
gerundively, adverb
nongerundive, adjective
nongerundively, adverb
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World English Dictionary
gerundive (dʒɪˈrʌndɪv)
 
n
1.  (in Latin grammar) an adjective formed from a verb, expressing the desirability of the activity denoted by the verb
 
adj
2.  of or relating to the gerund or gerundive
 
[C17: from Late Latin gerundīvus, from gerundiumgerund]
 
gerundival
 
adj
 
ge'rundively
 
adv

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Example sentences
But the conditional and the gerundive have by no means been banished outright.
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