gerund

[jer-uhnd]
noun Grammar.
1.
(in certain languages, as Latin) a form regularly derived from a verb and functioning as a noun, having in Latin all case forms but the nominative, as Latin dicendī gen., dicendō, dat., abl., etc., “saying.”
2.
the English -ing form of a verb when functioning as a noun, as writing in Writing is easy.
3.
a form similar to the Latin gerund in meaning or function.

Origin:
1505–15; < Late Latin gerundium, Latin gerundum that which is to be carried on, equivalent to ger(ere) to bear, carry on + -undum, variant of -endum, gerund suffix

gerundial [juh-ruhn-dee-uhl] , adjective
gerundially, adverb
nongerundial, adjective


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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
gerund (ˈdʒɛrənd)
 
n
a noun formed from a verb, denoting an action or state. In English, the gerund, like the present participle, is formed in -ing: the living is easy
 
[C16: from Late Latin gerundium, from Latin gerundum something to be carried on, from gerere to wage]
 
gerundial
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gerund
1513, from L.L. gerundium, from Old Latin gerundum "to be carried out," gerundive of gerere "to bear, carry." In L., a verbal noun used for all cases of the infinitive but the nominative; applied in Eng. to verbal nouns in -ing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
gerund [(jer-uhnd)]

A form of a verb that ends in -ing and operates as a noun in a sentence: “Thinking can be painful.”

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
But then you have a problem with parallel structure--a gerund and a noun.
The gerund the gerund is formed similarly to the present active participle.
Our period has also established a new verbal-the gerund.
The use of ere with a gerund is particularly to be avoided.
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