gospel

[gos-puhl]
noun
1.
the teachings of Jesus and the apostles; the Christian revelation.
2.
the story of Christ's life and teachings, especially as contained in the first four books of the new testament, namely Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.
3.
(usually initial capital letter) any of these four books.
4.
something regarded as true and implicitly believed: to take his report for gospel.
5.
a doctrine regarded as of prime importance: political gospel.
6.
glad tidings, especially concerning salvation and the kingdom of God as announced to the world by Christ.
7.
(often initial capital letter) Ecclesiastical. an extract from one of the four Gospels, forming part of the Eucharistic service in certain churches.
adjective
9.
of, pertaining to, or proclaiming the gospel or its teachings: a gospel preacher.
10.
in accordance with the gospel; evangelical.
11.
of or pertaining to gospel music: a gospel singer.

Origin:
before 950; Middle English go(d)spell, Old English gōdspell (see good, spell2); translation of Greek euangélion good news; see evangel1

nongospel, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
gospel (ˈɡɒspəl)
 
n
1.  Also called: gospel truth an unquestionable truth: to take someone's word as gospel
2.  a doctrine maintained to be of great importance
3.  Black religious music originating in the churches of the Southern states of the United States
4.  the message or doctrine of a religious teacher
5.  a.  the story of Christ's life and teachings as narrated in the Gospels
 b.  the good news of salvation in Jesus Christ
 c.  (as modifier): the gospel story
 
[Old English gōdspell, from gōdgood + spell message; see spell²; compare Old Norse guthspjall, Old High German guotspell]

Gospel (ˈɡɒspəl)
 
n
1.  any of the first four books of the New Testament, namely Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John
2.  a reading from one of these in a religious service

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gospel
O.E. godspel "good news," from god "good" + spel "story, message," translation of L. bona adnuntiatio, itself a translation of Gk. euangelion "reward for bringing good news." First element of the O.E. word had a long "o," but it shifted under mistaken assoc. with God. Gospel-gossip was Addison's word
("Spectator," 1711) for "one who is always talking of sermons, texts, etc."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

gospel definition


The “good news” of salvation (see Gospels). Certain styles of religious music are also called “gospel.” (See spirituals.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang Dictionary

gospel (truth) definition


  1. n.
    the honest truth. : You gotta believe me. It's the gospel truth!
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Gospel definition


a word of Anglo-Saxon origin, and meaning "God's spell", i.e., word of God, or rather, according to others, "good spell", i.e., good news. It is the rendering of the Greek _evangelion_, i.e., "good message." It denotes (1) "the welcome intelligence of salvation to man as preached by our Lord and his followers. (2.) It was afterwards transitively applied to each of the four histories of our Lord's life, published by those who are therefore called 'Evangelists', writers of the history of the gospel (the evangelion). (3.) The term is often used to express collectively the gospel doctrines; and 'preaching the gospel' is often used to include not only the proclaiming of the good tidings, but the teaching men how to avail themselves of the offer of salvation, the declaring of all the truths, precepts, promises, and threatenings of Christianity." It is termed "the gospel of the grace of God" (Acts 20:24), "the gospel of the kingdom" (Matt. 4:23), "the gospel of Christ" (Rom. 1:16), "the gospel of peace (Eph. 6:15), "the glorious gospel," "the everlasting gospel," "the gospel of salvation" (Eph. 1:13).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
The gospel of success will recapture the imagination.
All one had to do was have the elders pray over you, sing gospel music and read
  a few scriptures-talk about a simple program.
If so, the manifesto's authors are determined to help spread the gospel.
They could also use their language to share the gospel in other countries.
Images for Gospel
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