follow Dictionary.com

Today's Word of the Day means...

hurt

[hurt] /hɜrt/
verb (used with object), hurt, hurting.
1.
to cause bodily injury to; injure:
He was badly hurt in the accident.
2.
to cause bodily pain to or in:
The wound still hurts him.
3.
to damage or decrease the efficiency of (a material object) by striking, rough use, improper care, etc.:
Moths can't hurt this suit because it's mothproof. Dirty oil can hurt a car's engine.
4.
to affect adversely; harm:
to hurt one's reputation; It wouldn't hurt the lawn if you watered it more often.
5.
to cause mental pain to; offend or grieve:
She hurt his feelings by not asking him to the party.
verb (used without object), hurt, hurting.
6.
to feel or suffer bodily or mental pain or distress:
My back still hurts.
7.
to cause bodily or mental pain or distress:
The blow to his pride hurt most.
8.
to cause injury, damage, or harm.
9.
to suffer want or need.
noun
10.
a blow that inflicts a wound; bodily injury or the cause of such injury.
11.
injury, damage, or harm.
12.
the cause of mental pain or offense, as an insult.
13.
Heraldry. a rounded azure.
adjective
14.
physically injured:
The hurt child was taken to the hospital.
15.
offended; unfavorably affected:
hurt pride.
16.
suggesting that one has been offended or is suffering in mind:
Take that hurt look off your face!
17.
damaged:
hurt merchandise.
Origin
1150-1200
1150-1200; (v.) Middle English hurten, hirten, herten to injure, damage, stumble, knock together, apparently < Old French hurter to knock (against), oppose (compare French heurter, orig. dial.), probably a verbal derivative of Frankish *hûrt ram, cognate with Old Norse hrūtr; (noun) Middle English < Old French, derivative of the v.
Related forms
hurtable, adjective
hurter, noun
unhurt, adjective
unhurting, adjective
Synonyms
3. mar, impair. 5. afflict, wound. 6. ache. 10. See injury. 12. cut, slight.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for hurting
  • Beyond that, labels are often explicit about whether the pesticide at hand is toxic to bees, and how to avoid hurting them.
  • But your activities are hurting your own species in the long run.
  • It was always after finally buying the new running shoes that my knees would start hurting again.
  • He instinctively shrank from hurting anybody's feelings.
  • He had no intention of hurting himself, but the accident occurred.
  • He cannot be mischievous or wicked without hurting himself.
  • It's laughable to suggest that he was lowering the trade value of these players, or hurting their motivation.
  • Student audiences often find her rhetoric unsettling and she ends up hurting the feelings of numerous other groups.
  • She couldn't write well, and she didn't want to let it show, even if it meant hurting me by seeming cold.
  • Some- one suggested he had fallen so many times that he knew how to take a tum- ble without hurting himself.
British Dictionary definitions for hurting

hurt1

/hɜːt/
verb hurts, hurting, hurt
1.
to cause physical pain to (someone or something)
2.
to cause emotional pain or distress to (someone)
3.
to produce a painful sensation in (someone) the bruise hurts
4.
(intransitive) (informal) to feel pain
noun
5.
physical, moral, or mental pain or suffering
6.
a wound, cut, or sore
7.
damage or injury; harm
adjective
8.
injured or pained physically or emotionally a hurt knee, a hurt look
Derived Forms
hurter, noun
Word Origin
C12 hurten to hit, from Old French hurter to knock against, probably of Germanic origin; compare Old Norse hrūtr ram, Middle High German hurt a collision

hurt2

/hɜːt/
noun
1.
(Southern English, dialect) another name for whortleberry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for hurting
hurt
c.1200, from O.Fr. hurter "to ram, strike, collide," perhaps from Frank. *hurt (cf. M.H.G. hurten "run at, collide," O.N. hrutr "ram"). Sense of "injury" is purely an Eng. development. Sense of "knock" died out 17c., but cf. hurtle.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Slang definitions & phrases for hurting

hurting

adjective

In great need; in distress: Guys, the last thing we want is to seem to be hurting for money (Armed forces & students fr black 1940s+)


hurt

adjective

Ugly; ill-favored; piss-ugly: I never saw anyone as hurt as her boyfriend (1980s+ Teenagers)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
Cite This Source
Idioms and Phrases with hurting
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for hurt

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for hurting

11
13
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with hurting