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inspired

[in-spahyuh rd] /ɪnˈspaɪərd/
adjective
1.
aroused, animated, or imbued with the spirit to do something, by or as if by supernatural or divine influence:
an inspired poet.
2.
resulting from such inspiration:
an inspired poem; an inspired plan.
3.
inhaled:
inspired air.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English; see inspire, -ed2
Related forms
inspiredly
[in-spahy-rid-lee, -spahyuh rd-] /ɪnˈspaɪ rɪd li, -ˈspaɪərd-/ (Show IPA),
adverb

inspire

[in-spahyuh r] /ɪnˈspaɪər/
verb (used with object), inspired, inspiring.
1.
to fill with an animating, quickening, or exalting influence:
His courage inspired his followers.
2.
to produce or arouse (a feeling, thought, etc.):
to inspire confidence in others.
3.
to fill or affect with a specified feeling, thought, etc.:
to inspire a person with distrust.
4.
to influence or impel:
Competition inspired her to greater efforts.
5.
to animate, as an influence, feeling, thought, or the like, does:
They were inspired by a belief in a better future.
6.
to communicate or suggest by a divine or supernatural influence:
writings inspired by God.
7.
to guide or control by divine influence.
8.
to prompt or instigate (utterances, acts, etc.) by influence, without avowal of responsibility.
9.
to give rise to, bring about, cause, etc.:
a philosophy that inspired a revolution.
10.
to take (air, gases, etc.) into the lungs in breathing; inhale.
11.
Archaic.
  1. to infuse (breath, life, etc.) by breathing (usually followed by into).
  2. to breathe into or upon.
verb (used without object), inspired, inspiring.
12.
to give inspiration.
13.
to inhale.
Origin
1300-50; Middle English inspiren < Latin inspīrāre to breathe upon or into, equivalent to in- in-2 + spīrāre to breathe
Related forms
inspirative
[in-spahyuh r-uh-tiv, in-spi-rey-tiv] /ɪnˈspaɪər ə tɪv, ˈɪn spɪˌreɪ tɪv/ (Show IPA),
adjective
inspirer, noun
inspiringly, adverb
preinspire, verb (used with object), preinspired, preinspiring.
pseudoinspiring, adjective
reinspire, verb, reinspired, reinspiring.
uninspiring, adjective
uninspiringly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for inspired
  • inspired by a seesaw, he devised a swinging lever that tightened the mainspring as it moved.
  • Photographs often are inspired as much by other photographs as by what they picture.
  • For many of us, it was the latter group who inspired us to become teachers.
  • Some locals say that the protests are a rebellion inspired by the leaders of illegal businesses against the rule of law.
  • Suburbia was a dream inspired by revulsion to city life.
  • He inspired others to celebrate right along with him.
  • These accounts, written before space travel was possible, have inspired generations of space scientists and explorers.
  • It may be conceived of as divinely inspired or as a human attribution.
  • He ended up raising more cash because he inspired people.
  • Neither of his parents went to college, and his chemistry set inspired him to pursue a science career.
British Dictionary definitions for inspired

inspired

/ɪnˈspaɪəd/
adjective
1.
aroused or guided by or as if aroused or guided by divine inspiration: an inspired performance, she was like one inspired
2.
extremely accurate or apt but based on intuition rather than knowledge or logical deduction: an inspired guess

inspire

/ɪnˈspaɪə/
verb
1.
to exert a stimulating or beneficial effect upon (a person); animate or invigorate
2.
(transitive; foll by with or to; may take an infinitive) to arouse (with a particular emotion or to a particular action); stir
3.
(transitive) to prompt or instigate; give rise to: her beauty inspired his love
4.
(transitive; often passive) to guide or arouse by divine influence or inspiration
5.
to take or draw (air, gas, etc) into the lungs; inhale
6.
(transitive) (archaic)
  1. to breathe into or upon
  2. to breathe life into
Derived Forms
inspirable, adjective
inspirative, adjective
inspirer, noun
inspiringly, adverb
Word Origin
C14 (in the sense: to breathe upon, blow into): from Latin inspīrāre, from spīrāre to breathe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inspired

inspire

v.

mid-14c., enspiren, "to fill (the mind, heart, etc., with grace, etc.);" also "to prompt or induce (someone to do something)," from Old French enspirer (13c.), from Latin inspirare "inflame; blow into" (see inspiration), a loan-translation of Greek pnein in the Bible. General sense of "influence or animate with an idea or purpose" is from late 14c. Also sometimes used in literal sense in Middle English Related: Inspired; inspires; inspiring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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inspired in Medicine

inspire in·spire (ĭn-spīr')
v. in·spired, in·spir·ing, in·spires
To draw in breath; to inhale.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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