mac

mac

1 [mak]
noun (often initial capital letter) Informal.
fellow; bud (a familiar term of address to a man or boy whose name is not known to the speaker).

Origin:
1650–60; special use of Mac

Dictionary.com Unabridged

mac

2 [mak]
noun Informal.
1.
a mackintosh.
Also, mack.


Origin:
shortened form

Mac

[mak]
noun
a male given name.

Mac-

a prefix found in many family names of Irish or Scottish gaelic origin, as MacBride and Macdonald.
Also, Mc-, Mc-, M'-.


Origin:
< Irish, Scots Gaelic mac son, Old Irish macc; akin to Welsh, Cornish mab

Mac.

M.Ac.

Master of Accountancy.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
mac or mack (mæk)
 
n
informal (Brit) mackintosh short for mackintosh
 
mack or mack
 
n

Mac (mæk)
 
n
chiefly (US), (Canadian) an informal term of address to a man
 
[C20: abstracted from Mac-, prefix of Scottish surnames]

MAC
 
abbreviation for
multiplexed analogue component: a transmission coding system for colour television using satellite broadcasting

Mac.
 
abbreviation for
Maccabees (books of the Apocrypha)

Mac-, Mc- or M'-
 
prefix
(in surnames of Scottish or Irish Gaelic origin) son of: MacDonald; MacNeice
 
[from Goidelic mac son of; compare Welsh mab, Cornish mab]
 
Mc-, Mc- or M'-
 
prefix
 
[from Goidelic mac son of; compare Welsh mab, Cornish mab]
 
M'-, Mc- or M'-
 
prefix
 
[from Goidelic mac son of; compare Welsh mab, Cornish mab]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Mac
casual, generic term of address for a man, 1928, from Ir. & Gaelic mac, from O.Celt. *makko-s "son;" a common prefix in Scottish and Irish names, hence, used generally from early 19c. for a Celtic Irishman. Cognate root *makwos "son" produced O.Welsh map, Welsh mab, ap "son;" also probably cognate with
O.E. mago "son, attendant, servant," O.N. mögr "son," Goth. magus "boy, servant," O.E. mægð "maid" (see maiden).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

Mac(k) definition

[mæk]
  1. n.
    a generic name for a man. (Also a term of address.) : Look, Mac, you want to make some big money?
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
Cite This Source
FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

MAC definition


1. Media Access Control.
2. Early system on Ferranti Mercury. Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959).

Mac definition

computer
The line of computers manufactured by Apple Inc. "Mac" is not primarily a nickname or an abbreviation, but a brand name and trademark in its own right. Apple currently (2009) refer to the brand as any of "Mac", "iMac" or "Macintosh" (all registered trademarks).
The Mac was Apple's successor to the Lisa. The project was proposed by Jef Raskin some time before Steve Jobs's famous visit to Xerox PARC. Jobs tried to scuttle the Macintosh project and only joined it later because he wasn't trusted to manage the Lisa project.
The Macintosh user interface was notable for popularising the graphical user interface, with its easy to learn and easy to use desktop metaphor.
The first Macintosh, introduced in January 1984, had a Motorola 68000 CPU, 128K of RAM, a small monochrome screen, and one built-in floppy disk drive with an external slot for one more, two serial ports and a four-voice sound generator. This was all housed in one small plastic case, including the screen. When more memory was available later in the year, a 512K Macintosh was nicknamed the "Fat Mac."
The Mac Plus (January 1986) added expandability by providing an external SCSI port for connecting hard disks, magnetic tape, and other high-speed devices.
The Mac SE (March 1987) had up to four megabytes of RAM, an optional built-in 20 megabyte hard disk and one internal expansion slot for connecting a third-party device.
The Mac II (March 1987) used the faster Motorola 68020 CPU with a 32-bit bus.
In 1994 the Power Mac was launched, and in 1999 the iMac was introduced. The SuperDrive appeared in the iMac in 2002.
The Macintosh Operating System is now officially called "Mac OS". Mac OS X is the successor to Mac OS 9, although its technological parent is the NEXTSTEP OS from Next, Inc., founded by Steve Jobs after he left Apple the first time. OS X is based largely on the BSD UNIX system. The core of the OS X operating system is released as free source code under the project name Darwin.
The standard Macintosh screen resolution is 72 dpi (making one point = one pixel), exactly half the 144 dpi resolution of the ancient Apple Imagewriter dot matrix printer.
If "Macintosh" were an acronym, some say it would stand for "Many Applications Crash, If Not, The Operating System Hangs". While this was true for pre Mac OS 9 systems, it is less true for Mac OS 9, and totally incorrect for Mac OS X, which has protected memory, so even if one application crashes, the system and other applications are unaffected.
See also Macintosh file system, Macintosh user interface.
Apple Home (http://apple.com/mac).
(2009-05-05)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
MAC
  1. maximum allowable cost

  2. media access control

  3. membrane attack complex

  4. military airlift command

  5. minimal alveolar concentration

  6. minimal anesthetic concentration

Mac.
  1. Maccabees

  2. Macedonia

  3. Macedonian

The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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