personify

[per-son-uh-fahy]
verb (used with object), personified, personifying.
1.
to attribute human nature or character to (an inanimate object or an abstraction), as in speech or writing.
2.
to represent (a thing or abstraction) in the form of a person, as in art.
3.
to embody (a quality, idea, etc.) in a real person or a concrete thing.
4.
to be an embodiment or incarnation of; typify: He personifies the ruthless ambition of some executives.
5.
to personate.

Origin:
1720–30; person + -ify; compare French personnifier, Italian personificare

personifiable, adjective
personifiant, adjective
personifier, noun
unpersonified, adjective
unpersonifying, adjective


4. represent, exemplify, incorporate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To PERSONIFIED
Collins
World English Dictionary
personify (pɜːˈsɒnɪˌfaɪ)
 
vb , -fies, -fying, -fied
1.  to attribute human characteristics to (a thing or abstraction)
2.  to represent (an abstract quality) in human or animal form
3.  (of a person or thing) to represent (an abstract quality), as in art or literature
4.  to be the embodiment of
 
per'sonifiable
 
adj
 
per'sonifier
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

personify
1727 "to attribute personal form to things or abstractions" (especially as an artistic or literary technique), from Fr. personnifier (17c.), as if from L. *personificare, from persona (see person) + -ficare "to make."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Machismo, personified in the tyrant or author, is deeply embedded in the
  culture.
Now, and by the few words at the door, he had become the thing personified.
War came of itself, the personified process overriding personal agents.
In many ways, she seems to have personified the more idealistic aspects of that
  frequently maligned era.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature