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sledding

[sled-ing] /ˈslɛd ɪŋ/
noun
1.
the state of the ground permitting use of a sled:
The mountain roads offer good sledding.
2.
the going, or kind of travel, for sleds, as determined by ground and weather conditions.
3.
a going, progress, or advance in any field:
The job won't be easy sledding.
4.
the act of conveying or riding on a sled.
Origin
1675-1685
1675-85, Americanism; sled + -ing1

sled

[sled] /slɛd/
noun
1.
a small vehicle consisting of a platform mounted on runners for use in traveling over snow or ice.
2.
a sledge.
verb (used without object), sledded, sledding.
3.
to coast, ride, or be carried on a sled.
verb (used with object), sledded, sledding.
4.
to convey by sled.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English sledde < Middle Dutch; akin to German Schlitten sled, sleigh; cf. slide
Related forms
sledlike, adjective
Can be confused
sled, sledge, sleigh.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for sledding
  • We seem to intuit that some good can come from rough sledding.
  • She spent hours with my brothers and me, making gingerbread houses or sledding or cutting out paper snowflakes.
  • Haying and sledding are haying and sledding, never mind trivial evolutions of gear.
  • In the winter they would go sledding or skating on the frozen creek, building a bonfire on the shore to keep warm.
  • The novel's denouement hinges on, of all things, an ill-fated sledding accident.
  • Or the spicy whiff of gingerbread that takes you right back to a sledding-filled snow day.
  • The nervous exegete, worried about having missed a buried meaning, might fail to hear the sound surfing and syllable sledding.
  • Use caution when sledding and inspect the area for obstacles.
  • In winter, skiing, snowmobiles and dog sledding are also popular.
  • Dog sledding is offered year-round, often in conjunction with a flight-seeing tour and glacier landing.
Word Origin and History for sledding

sled

n.

early 14c., "a dragged vehicle used for transport of heavy goods," from Middle Dutch sledde "sled," from Proto-Germanic *slid- (cf. Old Saxon slido, Old Norse sleði, Danish slæde, Swedish släde, Old High German slito, German Schlitten "sledge"), from the same root as Old English slidan (see slide (v.)). Not found in Old English. In reference to a sleigh used for travel or recreation, it is attested from 1580s, now mainly American English.

v.

"transport on a sled," 1718; "ride on a sled," 1780, from sled (n.). Related: Sledded; sledding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with sledding
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for sledding

sled

vehicle usually drawn by either horses or dogs over ice or snow in winter. Its predecessor, the sledge, in the form of the travois and the sidecar, is believed to have been the first vehicle used by humans.

Learn more about sled with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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