vine

[vahyn]
noun
1.
any plant having a long, slender stem that trails or creeps on the ground or climbs by winding itself about a support or holding fast with tendrils or claspers.
2.
the stem of any such plant.
3.
a grape plant.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Old French vi(g)ne < Latin vīnea vine(yard), equivalent to vīn(um) wine + -ea, feminine of -eus -eous

vineless, adjective
vinelike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
vine (vaɪn)
 
n
1.  any of various plants, esp the grapevine, having long flexible stems that creep along the ground or climb by clinging to a support by means of tendrils, leafstalks, etc
2.  the stem of such a plant
 
[C13: from Old French vine, from Latin vīnea vineyard, from vīneus belonging to wine, from vīnum wine]
 
vined
 
adj
 
'vineless
 
adj
 
'vinelike
 
adj
 
'viny
 
adj

Vine (vaɪn)
 
n
Barbara. See (Ruth) Rendell

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vine
c.1300, from O.Fr. vigne, from L. vinea "vine, vineyard," from vinum "wine," from PIE *win-o-, from an Italic noun related to words for "wine" in Gk., Armenian, Hittite, and non-I.E. Georgian and West Semitic (cf. Heb. yayin, Ethiopian wayn); probably ult. from a lost Mediterranean language word *w(o)in-
"wine." The European grape vine was imported to California via Mexico by priests in 1564.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Vine definition


one of the most important products of Palestine. The first mention of it is in the history of Noah (Gen. 9:20). It is afterwards frequently noticed both in the Old and New Testaments, and in the ruins of terraced vineyards there are evidences that it was extensively cultivated by the Jews. It was cultivated in Palestine before the Israelites took possession of it. The men sent out by Moses brought with them from the Valley of Eshcol a cluster of grapes so large that "they bare it between two upon a staff" (Num. 13: 23). The vineyards of En-gedi (Cant. 1:14), Heshbon, Sibmah, Jazer, Elealeh (Isa. 16:8-10; Jer. 48:32, 34), and Helbon (Ezek. 27:18), as well as of Eshcol, were celebrated. The Church is compared to a vine (Ps. 80:8), and Christ says of himself, "I am the vine" (John 15:1). In one of his parables also (Matt. 21:33) our Lord compares his Church to a vineyard which "a certain householder planted, and hedged round about," etc. Hos. 10:1 is rendered in the Revised Version, "Israel is a luxuriant vine, which putteth forth his fruit," instead of "Israel is an empty vine, he bringeth forth fruit unto himself," of the Authorized Version.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

vine

see clinging vine; wither on the vine.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
Dodder, native to tropical and temperate climates around the world, is a
  parasitic vine that wraps around a host plant.
With close neighbors, you could plant a blooming vine on it for a living fence.
Kudzu is a climbing vine that rapidly overtakes other plants.
Suggested use: ground or fence cover, climbing vine.
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