abdication

[ab-di-key-shuhn]
noun
the act or state of abdicating; renunciation.

Origin:
1545–55; < Latin abdicātiōn- (stem of abdicātiō). See abdicate, -ion

nonabdication, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To abdication
Collins
World English Dictionary
abdicate (ˈæbdɪˌkeɪt)
 
vb
to renounce (a throne, power, responsibility, rights, etc), esp formally
 
[C16: from the past participle of Latin abdicāre to proclaim away, disclaim]
 
abdicable
 
adj
 
abdi'cation
 
n
 
abdicative
 
adj
 
'abdicator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

abdication
1550s, "a disowning," from L. abdicationem (nom. abdicatio), noun of action from abdicare (see abdicate); sense of "resignation of sovereignty" is from 1688.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
He is interpreting your allowing him up there as abdication of your pack leader
  status and he is taking advantage of it.
Workplace bullying of any kind is often accompanied by an abdication of
  managerial responsibilities.
Yet rather than contrition, there is nothing but posturing and abdication of
  any responsibility.
It's an abdication of responsibility, integrity, standards.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature