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abiding

[uh-bahy-ding] /əˈbaɪ dɪŋ/
adjective
1.
continuing without change; enduring; steadfast:
an abiding faith.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English; see abide, -ing2
Related forms
abidingly, adverb
abidingness, noun
nonabiding, adjective
nonabidingly, adverb
nonabidingness, noun
unabiding, adjective
unabidingly, adverb
unabidingness, noun
Synonyms
unending, unchanging, unshakable.

abide

[uh-bahyd] /əˈbaɪd/
verb (used without object), abode or abided, abiding.
1.
to remain; continue; stay:
Abide with me.
2.
to have one's abode; dwell; reside:
to abide in a small Scottish village.
3.
to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship, etc.; last.
verb (used with object), abode or abided, abiding.
4.
to put up with; tolerate; stand:
I can't abide dishonesty!
5.
to endure, sustain, or withstand without yielding or submitting:
to abide a vigorous onslaught.
6.
to wait for; await:
to abide the coming of the Lord.
7.
to accept without opposition or question:
to abide the verdict of the judges.
8.
to pay the price or penalty of; suffer for.
Verb phrases
9.
abide by,
  1. to act in accord with.
  2. to submit to; agree to:
    to abide by the court's decision.
  3. to remain steadfast or faithful to; keep:
    If you make a promise, abide by it.
Origin
before 1000; Middle English abiden, Old English ābīdan; cognate with Old High German irbītan await, Gothic usbeisns expectation, patience. See a-3, bide
Related forms
abider, noun
Synonyms
1. tarry. 2. live. 3. persevere, endure. 4. bear, endure, brook; support.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for abiding
  • The standards of adulthood should be an abiding rebuke to the dispositions of adolescence.
  • The author traces some abiding infatuations-and old antagonisms-to his seaside boyhood home.
  • We have always prided ourselves on abiding by our own principles regardless of what anyone else was doing.
  • Nonetheless, devolution is a healthy and abiding tendency.
  • All of my other traceable family lines seem to be normal peaceful law abiding and successful people.
  • But it's naive to suppose that such approaches will be convincing to those abiding by faith.
  • They will be abiding by stricter regulations on the level and quality of their prudential capital.
  • He had an abiding belief that these systems were governed by scientific laws, and he strove to find them.
  • We will profoundly miss his abiding friendship, his wit, and his wise counsel.
  • Behavioral economists consider an abiding faith in rationality to be wishful thinking.
British Dictionary definitions for abiding

abiding

/əˈbaɪdɪŋ/
adjective
1.
permanent; enduring: an abiding belief
Derived Forms
abidingly, adverb

abide

/əˈbaɪd/
verb abides, abiding, abode, abided
1.
(transitive) to tolerate; put up with
2.
(transitive) to accept or submit to; suffer: to abide the court's decision
3.
(intransitive) foll by by
  1. to comply (with): to abide by the decision
  2. to remain faithful (to): to abide by your promise
4.
(intransitive) to remain or continue
5.
(intransitive) (archaic) to dwell
6.
(transitive) (archaic) to await in expectation
7.
(transitive) (archaic) to withstand or sustain; endure: to abide the onslaught
Derived Forms
abidance, noun
abider, noun
Word Origin
Old English ābīdan, from a- (intensive) + bīdan to wait, bide
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for abiding
adj.

late 14c., "enduring," present participle adjective from abide (v.).

abide

v.

Old English abidan, gebidan "remain, wait, delay, remain behind," from ge- completive prefix (denoting onward motion; see a- (1)) + bidan "bide, remain, wait, dwell" (see bide). Originally intransitive (with genitive of the object: we abidon his "we waited for him"); transitive sense emerged in Middle English. Meaning "to put up with" (now usually negative) first recorded 1520s. Related: Abided; abiding. The historical conjugation is abide, abode, abidden, but the modern formation is now generally weak.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with abiding

abide

In addition to the idioms beginning with abide abide by also see: can't stand (abide)
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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