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achy

[ey-kee] /ˈeɪ ki/
adjective, achier, achiest.
1.
having or causing an aching sensation:
an achy back.
Origin
1870-1875
1870-75; ache + -y1
Related forms
achiness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for achy
  • As many people would, she took a pack of frozen vegetables, wrapped it in a towel and applied it to the achy area.
  • Pop two at bedtime to get your achy limbs ready to move the next day.
  • When flying for long stretches, legs can get sore and achy from immobility.
  • Tylenol brought the fever down, but she woke up the next morning vomiting and feeling achy and weak.
  • Many parts of the country are now sneezing, sniffling and coughing their way through yet another achy flu season.
  • Within days, he felt achy and nauseated and experienced a tingling in his hands.
  • After a long day of work, the big thing is coming back the next day not swollen, not achy or hurting.
  • Within months she developed stiff, achy joints and her fingers swelled.
  • Still weak and achy despite a week out sick, there comes a time when you have to go back to work, ready or not.
British Dictionary definitions for achy

achy

/ˈeɪkɪ/
adjective achier, achiest
1.
affected by a continuous dull pain; aching
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for achy
adj.

1875, first recorded in George Eliot's letters, from ache + -y (2). Middle English had akeful "painful" (early 15c.). Related: Achily; achiness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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