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administer

[ad-min-uh-ster] /ædˈmɪn ə stər/
verb (used with object)
1.
to manage (affairs, a government, etc.); have executive charge of:
to administer the law.
2.
to bring into use or operation:
to administer justice; to administer last rites.
3.
to make application of; give:
to administer medicine.
4.
to supervise the formal taking of (an oath or the like).
5.
Law. to manage or dispose of, as a decedent's estate by an executor or administrator or a trust estate by a trustee.
verb (used without object)
6.
to contribute assistance; bring aid or supplies (usually followed by to):
to administer to the poor.
7.
to perform the duties of an administrator:
She administers quite effectively.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; < Latin administrāre to assist, carry out, manage the affairs of (see ad-, minister); replacing Middle English amynistre (with a-5) < Middle French aministrer
Related forms
administrant
[ad-min-uh-struh nt] /ædˈmɪn ə strənt/ (Show IPA),
noun
nonadministrant, adjective
self-administered, adjective
self-administering, adjective
unadministered, adjective
well-administered, adjective
Synonyms
1. conduct, control, execute; direct, superintend, supervise, oversee. See rule. 2. distribute, supply, furnish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for administer
  • Organic producers cannot take that approach and must administer needed medication.
  • As the plan is to administer the anaesthetic while the patient sleeps, it is no wonder that failure attends the effort.
  • The participant was told to read test questions, and to administer a shock when the learner gave the wrong answer.
  • Department is in natural science division, and helps administer a neuroscience concentration.
  • As a way to administer some nasty disinflationary medicine the doctrine worked.
  • After two years, researchers compared the results of the rural home visits to urban clinics that only administer drugs.
  • They begin to actively administer some portions of the contested area.
  • Quotas are easy to administer and regulate but are based on population estimates that are often wrong.
  • Issuing permits to suppliers is easier to administer because no smokestacks need to be monitored.
  • They are trained how to administer intravenous lines and advanced airway treatment.
British Dictionary definitions for administer

administer

/ədˈmɪnɪstə/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
(also intransitive) to direct or control (the affairs of a business, government, etc)
2.
to put into execution; dispense: administer justice
3.
when intr, foll by to. to give or apply (medicine, assistance, etc) as a remedy or relief
4.
to apply formally; perform: to administer extreme unction
5.
to supervise or impose the taking of (an oath, etc)
6.
to manage or distribute (an estate, property, etc)
Word Origin
C14: amynistre, via Old French from Latin administrare, from ad- to + ministrāre to minister
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for administer
v.

late 14c., administren, aministren "to manage as a steward," from Old French amenistrer "help, aid, be of service to" (12c., Modern French administrer, the -d- restored 16c.), and directly from Latin administrare "manage, control, guide, superintend; rule direct," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + ministrare "serve" (see minister (v.)). Used of medicine, etc., "to give," from 1540s. Related: Administered; administering.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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