follow Dictionary.com

Stories We Like: A Guide to the Comma

admonition

[ad-muh-nish-uh n] /ˌæd məˈnɪʃ ən/
noun
1.
an act of admonishing.
2.
counsel, advice, or caution.
3.
a gentle reproof.
4.
a warning or reproof given by an eccleslastical authority.
Origin
late Middle English
1350-1400
1350-1400; < Latin admonitiōn- (stem of admonitiō); see ad-, monition; replacing late Middle English amonicioun < Anglo-French < Latin; see admonish
Related forms
preadmonition, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for admonition
  • Advice on how to avoid danger abounds: "Drink plenty of water and walk real slow" is a typical admonition.
  • I'm just saying your admonition is short sighted and incorrect.
  • When he graduated from Exeter in 1938, he ignored his uncle's admonition to go to college.
  • To some students, that admonition may have seemed like empty bluster.
  • If a receiver doesn't finish a route, Garrard delivers a stern admonition not to let it happen again.
  • Remember Lincoln's admonition about opening one's mouth and proving the fool.
  • This admonition comes to mind when I read the recent criticism of oil company profits.
  • He that is open to flattery, is fenced against admonition.
  • Few rules of contemporary society seem more unanimous right now than the strict admonition against using a smartphone at mealtime.
  • But heeding their admonition to end the program would be a grave mistake.
Word Origin and History for admonition
admonition
late 14c., from O.Fr. admonition, from L. admonitionem (nom. admonitio), noun of action from admonere (see admonish).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for admonition

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for admonition

13
0
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with admonition