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adore

[uh-dawr, uh-dohr] /əˈdɔr, əˈdoʊr/
verb (used with object), adored, adoring.
1.
to regard with the utmost esteem, love, and respect; honor.
2.
to pay divine honor to; worship:
to adore God.
3.
to like or admire very much:
I simply adore the way your hair is done!
verb (used without object), adored, adoring.
4.
to worship.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; < Latin adōrāre to speak to, pray, worship, equivalent to ad- ad- + ōrāre to speak, beg (see oral); replacing Middle English aour(i)e < Old French aourer < Latin
Related forms
adorer, noun
adoringly, adverb
unadored, adjective
unadoring, adjective
unadoringly, adverb
Synonyms
1. idolize; reverence, revere, venerate.
Antonyms
1. abhor.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for adoring
  • Their limo arrived at their prom with adoring onlookers.
  • He loves his family, takes his responsibilities seriously and truly appreciates his adoring public.
  • The house is furnished in masculine dark woods, with signed photos of adoring females on the walls of the den.
  • The modern motherhood enfolds one or two adoring children of its own blood, and cherishes, protects and loves them.
  • When she arrived to open the exhibition, it was to a dazzle of flash photography and the crush of an adoring throng.
  • Every bone in his body wants to be out before adoring crowds.
  • They even provide buses to ferry in adoring followers from the furthest corners of the state.
  • He seems to be happiest as a politician addressing huge crowds of adoring fans.
  • He peers diffidently through the windows, perhaps wondering where all the adoring crowds are.
  • Bond fund managers are suddenly surrounded by adoring fans.
British Dictionary definitions for adoring

adore

/əˈdɔː/
verb
1.
(transitive) to love intensely or deeply
2.
to worship (a god) with religious rites
3.
(transitive) (informal) to like very much: I adore chocolate
Derived Forms
adorer, noun
adoring, adjective
adoringly, adverb
Word Origin
C15: via French from Latin adōrāre, from ad- to + ōrāre to pray
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for adoring
adj.

1650s, "worshipping," present participle adjective from adore. Related: Adoringly.

adore

v.

late 14c., aouren, "to worship, pay divine honors to, bow down before," from Old French aorer "to adore, worship, praise" (10c.), from Latin adorare "speak to formally, beseech, ask in prayer," in Late Latin "to worship," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + orare "speak formally, pray" (see orator). Meaning "to honor very highly" is attested from 1590s; weakened sense of "to be very fond of" emerged by 1880s. Related: Adored; adoring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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adoring in the Bible

to worship; to express reverence and homage. The forms of adoration among the Jews were putting off the shoes (Ex. 3:5; Josh. 5:15), and prostration (Gen. 17:3; Ps. 95:6; Isa. 44:15, 17, 19; 46:6). To "kiss the Son" in Ps. 2:12 is to adore and worship him. (See Dan. 3:5, 6.) The word itself does not occur in Scripture.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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