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allege

[uh-lej] /əˈlɛdʒ/
verb (used with object), alleged, alleging.
1.
to assert without proof.
2.
to declare with positiveness; affirm; assert:
to allege a fact.
3.
to declare before a court or elsewhere, as if under oath.
4.
to plead in support of; offer as a reason or excuse.
5.
Archaic. to cite or quote in confirmation.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English alleg(g)en, probably < Old French aleguer (< Medieval Latin, Latin allēgāre to adduce in support of a plea; see allegation), conflated with Anglo-French, Old French aleg(i)er to justify, free, literally, to lighten (< Late Latin alleviāre; see alleviate); homonymous Middle English v. alleg(g)en, with literal sense of Old French aleg(i)er, replaced by allay in 16th cent.
Related forms
allegeable, adjective
alleger, noun
misallege, verb (used with object), misalleged, misalleging.
preallege, verb (used with object), prealleged, prealleging.
reallege, verb (used with object), realleged, realleging.
Can be confused
accuse, allege, charge.
Synonyms
1. See maintain. 2. state, asseverate, aver. 3. attest.
Antonyms
2. deny.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for allege
  • The court held that the complaint was defective because it failed to allege the amount claimed to be in controversy.
  • The parents allege that the district failed to examine the impact the networks could have on growing children's health.
  • The faculty members allege a number of improprieties during a 37-year period.
  • Be prepared for him to allege that you're crazy and unfit.
  • There is some truth to these allegations, but less than the slogans allege.
  • Some of the charges allege more recent crimes including credit fraud .
  • The reply should merely admit or deny and should not give detailed reasons therefor, nor allege detailed facts.
  • His supporters now allege there was “systematic cheating” in the polls.
  • Some media reports allege ill-treatment of farm workers.
  • Accordingly, he fails to allege facts upon which his breach of contract claim may survive, and it should therefore be stricken.
British Dictionary definitions for allege

allege

/əˈlɛdʒ/
verb (transitive; may take a clause as object)
1.
to declare in or as if in a court of law; state without or before proof: he alleged malpractice
2.
to put forward (an argument or plea) for or against an accusation, claim, etc
3.
(archaic) to cite or quote, as to confirm
Word Origin
C14 aleggen, ultimately from Latin allēgāre to dispatch on a mission, from lēx law
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for allege
v.

c.1300. It has the form of one French verb and the meaning of another. The form is Anglo-French aleger, Old French eslegier "to clear at law," from Latin ex- "out of" (see ex-) and litigare "bring suit" (see litigate); however eslegier meant "acquit, clear of charges in a lawsuit." It somehow acquired the meaning of French alléguer, from Latin allegare "send for, bring forth, name, produce in evidence," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + legare "to depute, send" (see legate). Related: Alleged; alleging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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