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anode

[an-ohd] /ˈæn oʊd/
noun
1.
the electrode or terminal by which current enters an electrolytic cell, voltaic cell, battery, etc.
2.
the negative terminal of a voltaic cell or battery.
3.
the positive terminal, electrode, or element of an electron tube or electrolytic cell.
Origin
1825-1835
1825-35; < Greek ánodos way up, equivalent to an- an-3 + hodós way, road
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for anode
  • Space-saving zinc-air power cells, for example, use air to activate a zinc anode.
  • Different materials for the anode and cathode, of course, affect this back-and-forth movement.
  • When a battery charges, energy moves between its cathode and anode.
  • These ions reach the anode and begin to oxidize the zinc--a reaction that produces current through the release of electrons.
  • Cells expansion and short circuit caused by direct anode contact and continuous high efficiency electric current overcharging.
  • The capacity of a normal rechargeable battery is limited by the amount of lithium ions that can be held by the battery's anode.
  • Clever anode membranes could repress chlorine production, eliminating the need for fresh water.
  • The anode is a critical component for storing energy in lithium-ion batteries.
  • A widespread misconception is that anode polarity is always positive.
British Dictionary definitions for anode

anode

/ˈænəʊd/
noun
1.
the positive electrode in an electrolytic cell
2.
Also called (esp US) plate. the positively charged electrode in an electronic valve
3.
the negative terminal of a primary cell Compare cathode
Derived Forms
anodal (eɪˈnəʊdəl), anodic (əˈnɒdɪk) adjective
Word Origin
C19: from Greek anodos a way up, from hodos a way; alluding to the movement of the current to or from the positive pole
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for anode
anode
1834, coined from Gk. anodos "way up," from ana "up" + hodos "way" (see cede). Proposed by the Rev. William Whewell (17941866), Eng. polymath, and published by Eng. chemist and physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867). So called from the path the electrical current was thought to take. Anodize is recorded from 1931.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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anode in Science
anode
  (ān'ōd')   
  1. The positive electrode in an electrolytic cell, toward which negatively charged particles are attracted. The anode has a positive charge because it is connected to the positively charged end of an external power supply.

  2. The positively charged element of an electrical device, such as a vacuum tube or a diode, to which electrons are attracted.

  3. The negative electrode of a voltaic cell, such as a battery. The anode gets its negative charge from the chemical reaction that happens inside the battery, not from an external source. Compare cathode.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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