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appalling

[uh-paw-ling] /əˈpɔ lɪŋ/
adjective
1.
causing dismay or horror:
an appalling accident; an appalling lack of manners.
Origin
1810-1820
1810-20; appall + -ing2
Related forms
appallingly, adverb
unappalling, adjective
unappallingly, adverb

appal

[uh-pawl] /əˈpɔl/
verb (used with object), appalled, appalling.
1.

appall

[uh-pawl] /əˈpɔl/
verb (used with object)
1.
to fill or overcome with horror, consternation, or fear; dismay:
He was appalled by the damage from the fire. I am appalled at your mistakes.
Also, appal.
Origin
1275-1325; Middle English < Middle French ap(p)allir to grow or make pale, equivalent to a- a-5 + pal(l)ir in same sense; see pale1
Synonyms
horrify, daunt. See frighten.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for appalling
  • This statistic has appalling implications.
  • Your behaviour is appalling.
  • The real literacy rate in this country is appalling.
  • The level of knowledge and sophistication is, with all due respect, appalling.
  • It is appalling that something like this isn't on the front cover of newspapers or plastered over the airwaves.
  • Many colleges cite lack of money and poor student preparation as an excuse for appalling failure rates.
  • The lack of grammar checking is appalling.
  • As an adolescent he was afflicted with an appalling stammer, and he still struggles occasionally with its residue.
  • They make an appalling noise, but a unique one, and it's something to savor.
  • Attempts to stifle freedom of speech are an appalling reflection on the country music establishment.
British Dictionary definitions for appalling

appalling

/əˈpɔːlɪŋ/
adjective
1.
causing extreme dismay, horror, or revulsion
2.
very bad
Derived Forms
appallingly, adverb

appal

/əˈpɔːl/
verb -pals, -palling, -palled (US) -palls, -palling, -palled
1.
(transitive) to fill with horror; shock or dismay
Word Origin
C14: from Old French appalir to turn pale
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for appalling
adj.

1620s, present participle adjective from appall. Colloquial weakened sense of "distasteful" is attested from 1919.

appall

v.

also appal, early 14c., "to fade;" c.1400, "to grow pale," from Old French apalir "become or make pale," from a- "to" (see ad-) + palir "grow pale," from Latin pallere (see pallor). Meaning "cause dismay or shock," is 1530s. Related: Appalled; appalling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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