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7 Essential Words of Fall

appease

[uh-peez] /əˈpiz/
verb (used with object), appeased, appeasing.
1.
to bring to a state of peace, quiet, ease, calm, or contentment; pacify; soothe:
to appease an angry king.
2.
to satisfy, allay, or relieve; assuage:
The fruit appeased his hunger.
3.
to yield or concede to the belligerent demands of (a nation, group, person, etc.) in a conciliatory effort, sometimes at the expense of justice or other principles.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English apesen < Anglo-French apeser, Old French apais(i)er, equivalent to a- a-5 + paisi- peace + -er infinitive suffix
Related forms
appeasable, adjective
appeasableness, noun
appeasably, adverb
appeasement, noun
appeaser, noun
appeasingly, adverb
nonappeasable, adjective
nonappeasing, adjective
unappeasable, adjective
unappeasably, adverb
unappeased, adjective
unappeasing, adjective
unappeasingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. calm, placate. 3. Appease, conciliate, propitiate imply trying to preserve or obtain peace. To appease is to make anxious overtures and often undue concessions to satisfy the demands of someone with a greed for power, territory, etc.: Chamberlain tried to appease Hitler at Munich. To conciliate is to win an enemy or opponent over by displaying a willingness to be just and fair: When mutual grievances are recognized, conciliation is possible. To propitiate is to admit a fault, and, by trying to make amends, to allay hostile feeling: to propitiate an offended neighbor.
Antonyms
1. enrage. 2. increase, arouse, sharpen. 3. defy.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for appeased
  • Legislative critics of the university were not appeased.
  • After the importance of baseball was explained to her and a new goose given to her she was appeased.
  • Physical power, perhaps, but it's clear that there are other powers that need to be appeased.
  • He repeatedly talks about nature, not as something to be understood and controlled, but as a mystery to be appeased.
  • To some degree such fears have been appeased by changes in the original plan.
  • Her evident disgust at the choice was not to be appeased.
  • Having appeased the critics, they hoped the problem would evaporate.
  • But it does particularly well when it is excused, rationalized or appeased.
  • In these refuges the hardships of poverty are eased, diseases cured, the threats of princes appeased.
  • They think that thus it is appeased and does less harm.
British Dictionary definitions for appeased

appease

/əˈpiːz/
verb (transitive)
1.
to calm, pacify, or soothe, esp by acceding to the demands of
2.
to satisfy or quell (an appetite or thirst, etc)
Derived Forms
appeasable, adjective
appeaser, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Old French apaisier, from pais peace, from Latin pax
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for appeased

appease

v.

c.1300 "to reconcile," from Anglo-French apeser, Old French apaisier "to pacify, make peace, appease, be reconciled, placate" (12c.), from the phrase a paisier "bring to peace," from a "to" (see ad-) + pais, from Latin pacem (nominative pax) "peace" (see peace). Related: Appeased; appeasing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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