follow Dictionary.com

What's the "een" in Halloween?

appoggiatura

[uh-poj-uh-too r-uh, -tyoo r-uh; Italian ahp-pawd-jah-too-rah] /əˌpɒdʒ əˈtʊər ə, -ˈtyʊər ə; Italian ɑpˌpɔd dʒɑˈtu rɑ/
noun, Music.
1.
a note of embellishment preceding another note and taking a portion of its time.
Origin
1745-1755
1745-55; < Italian: a propping, equivalent to appoggiat(o), past participle of appoggiare to support (see ap-1, podi(um), -ate1) + -ura -ure
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for appoggiatura

appoggiatura

/əˌpɒdʒəˈtʊərə/
noun (pl) -ras, -re (-rɛ)
1.
(music) an ornament consisting of a nonharmonic note (short or long) preceding a harmonic one either before or on the stress See also acciaccatura (sense 2)
Word Origin
C18: from Italian, literally: a propping, from appoggiare to prop, support
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Article for appoggiatura

(from Italian appoggiare, "to lean"), in music, an ornamental note of long or short duration that temporarily displaces, and subsequently resolves into, a main note, usually by stepwise motion. During the Renaissance and early Baroque, the appoggiatura was of moderate length, averaging one-third of the main note, and was more in the nature of a melodic than a harmonic ornament. By the time of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), appoggiaturas were divided into two species: the short, which borrows an inconsiderable length from its main note and therefore has little effect on the harmony; and the long, which takes half or more of the length of its main note and therefore substantially affects the harmony, creating a dissonance that then resolves, on the main note, to a consonance. Because its purpose was mainly expressive, whether in purely melodic or harmonic terms, the typical appoggiatura in 17th- and 18th-century music occurred on the beat, rather than before it, "leaning" on the principal note, as suggested by the term's derivation

Learn more about appoggiatura with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for appoggiatura

18
0
Scrabble Words With Friends