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appointed

[uh-poin-tid] /əˈpɔɪn tɪd/
adjective
1.
by, through, or as a result of an appointment (often in contrast with elected):
an appointed official.
2.
predetermined; arranged; set:
They met at the appointed time in the appointed place.
3.
provided with what is necessary; equipped; furnished:
a beautifully appointed office.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; appoint + -ed2
Related forms
quasi-appointed, adjective
unappointed, adjective

appoint

[uh-point] /əˈpɔɪnt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to name or assign to a position, an office, or the like; designate:
to appoint a new treasurer; to appoint a judge to the bench.
2.
to determine by authority or agreement; fix; set:
to appoint a time for the meeting.
3.
Law. to designate (a person) to take the benefit of an estate created by a deed or will.
4.
to provide with what is necessary; equip; furnish:
They appointed the house with all the latest devices.
5.
Archaic. to order or establish by decree or command; ordain; constitute:
laws appointed by God.
6.
Obsolete. to point at by way of censure.
verb (used without object)
7.
Obsolete. to ordain; resolve; determine.
Origin
1325-75; Middle English apointen < Middle French apointer, equivalent to a- a-5 + pointer to point
Related forms
appointable, adjective
appointer, noun
misappoint, verb (used with object)
reappoint, verb (used with object)
unappointable, adjective
Synonyms
1. choose, select. 2. prescribe, establish.
Antonyms
1. dismiss, discharge.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for appointed
  • The candidate should have the requisite experience to be appointed as a full professor on a fixed term.
  • No one goes through the pains of getting elected to get told what to do by some guy who is appointed.
  • As sun thermonuclear energy is running out, this dark region will become sizable, at the appointed time of the reaction.
  • Gallaudet's board originally appointed a provost as.
  • The government is appointed by the prime minister, who is appointed by the president.
  • Each province is led by a governor who is appointed by the president of the country.
  • Two immediate challenges will face whoever is appointed.
  • Adjunct faculty positions are appointed on a course-by-course, semester basis as needed.
  • It has appointed a new electoral commission and forced out the bosses of the anti-corruption authority.
  • Some potential internal candidates stay out of the search but offer to be available if no other candidate is appointed.
British Dictionary definitions for appointed

appoint

/əˈpɔɪnt/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
(also intransitive) to assign officially, as for a position, responsibility, etc he was appointed manager
2.
to establish by agreement or decree; fix a time was appointed for the duel
3.
to prescribe or ordain laws appointed by tribunal
4.
(property law) to nominate (a person), under a power granted in a deed or will, to take an interest in property
5.
to equip with necessary or usual features; furnish a well-appointed hotel
Derived Forms
appointer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French apointer to put into a good state, from a point in good condition, literally: to a point
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for appointed
appoint
late 14c., from O.Fr. apointier "to arrange, settle, place" (12c.), from apointer "duly, fitly," from phrase à point "to the point," from a- "to" + point "point," from L. punctum. The ground sense is "to come to a point about (a matter)," therefore "agree, settle."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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14
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