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around

[uh-round] /əˈraʊnd/
adverb
1.
in a circle, ring, or the like; so as to surround a person, group, thing, etc.:
The crowd gathered around.
2.
on all sides; about:
His land is fenced all around.
3.
in all directions from a center or point of reference:
He owns the land for miles around.
4.
in a region or area neighboring a place:
all the country around.
5.
in circumference:
The tree was 40 inches around.
6.
in a circular or rounded course:
to fly around and around.
7.
through a sequence or series, as of places or persons:
to show someone around.
8.
through a recurring period, as of time, especially to the present or a particular time:
when spring rolls around again.
9.
by a circuitous or roundabout course:
The driveway to the house goes around past the stables.
10.
to a place or point, as by a circuit or circuitous course:
to get around into the navigable channel.
11.
with a rotating course or movement:
The wheels turned around.
12.
in or to another or opposite direction, course, opinion, etc.:
Sit still and don't turn around. After our arguments, she finally came around.
13.
back into consciousness:
The smelling salts brought her around.
14.
in circulation, action, etc.; about:
He hasn't been around lately. The play has been around for years. When will she be up and around?
15.
somewhere near or about; nearby:
I'll be around if you need me.
16.
to a specific place:
He came around to see me.
preposition
17.
about; on all sides; encircling; encompassing:
a halo around his head.
18.
so as to encircle, surround, or envelop:
to tie paper around a package.
19.
on the edge, border, or outer part of:
a skirt with fringe around the bottom.
20.
from place to place in; about:
to get around town.
21.
in all or various directions from:
to look around one.
22.
in the vicinity of:
the country around Boston.
23.
approximately; about:
It's around five o'clock.
24.
here and there in:
There are many cafés around the city.
25.
somewhere in or near:
to stay around the house.
26.
to all or various parts of:
to wander around the country.
27.
so as to make a circuit about or partial circuit to the other side of:
to go around the lake; to sail around a cape.
28.
reached by making a turn or partial circuit about:
the church around the corner.
29.
so as to revolve or rotate about a center or axis:
the earth's motion around its axis.
30.
personally close to:
Only the few advisers around the party leader understood his real motives.
31.
so as to get by a difficulty:
They got around the lack of chairs by sitting on the floor.
32.
so as to have a foundation in:
The novel is built around a little-known historical event.
Idioms
33.
been around, having had much worldly experience:
He's been around and isn't likely to be taken in.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English around(e). See a-1, round
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for around
  • Window smashing and graffiti followed the course of protestors around the downtown area.
  • Pour or shovel in remaining lava stone around pipe to hold it in place.
  • They are held every four years in a different place around the world.
  • Place shorter or trailing plants around the perimeter of the container.
  • Repeat on remaining two sides, then staple all around the edges, pulling cloth tight.
  • As a tropical disturbance grows in strength, surface pressure in the area around the storm falls.
  • Pour oil around side of wok, then tilt wok to swirl oil, coating sides.
  • Spur the engine as intended and there's surprising muscle either around town or on the open road.
  • Protesters around the world demand that something must be done.
  • The planet orbits inside a disk of material around the star that's no more than two million years old.
British Dictionary definitions for around

around

/əˈraʊnd/
preposition
1.
situated at various points in a lot of shelves around the house
2.
from place to place in driving around Ireland
3.
somewhere in or near to stay around the house
4.
approximately in it happened around 1957, I think
adverb
5.
surrounding, encircling, or enclosing a band around her head
6.
in all directions from a point of reference he owns the land for ten miles around
7.
in the vicinity, esp restlessly but idly to wait around, stand around
8.
here and there; in no particular place or direction dotted around
9.
(informal) (of people) active and prominent in a particular area or profession some pop stars are around for only a few years
10.
(informal) present in some place (the exact location being inexact) he's around here somewhere
11.
(informal) in circulation; available that type of phone has been around for some years now
12.
(informal) to many places, so as to have gained considerable experience, often of a worldly or social nature he gets around, I've been around
Usage note
In American English, around is usually used instead of round in adverbial and prepositional senses, except in a few fixed phrases such as all year round. The use of around in adverbial senses is less common in British English
Word Origin
C17 (rare earlier): from a-² + round
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for around
adv.

c.1300, "in circumference," from phrase on round. Rare before 1600. In sense of "here and there with no fixed direction" it is 1776, American English (properly about). Of time, from 1888. To have been around "gained worldly experience" is from 1927, U.S. colloquial.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for around

around

sentence

The subject is not naive, but is experienced and clever: He may look innocent, but he's been around/ Having been around the block, Sylvia not only writes stories but dispenses advice/ Oliver's been around the block and won't be seduced by money ( first variant 1920s+, second variant 1990s+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with around
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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