follow Dictionary.com

Is irregardless a word?

arsis

[ahr-sis] /ˈɑr sɪs/
noun, plural arses
[ahr-seez] /ˈɑr siz/ (Show IPA)
1.
Music. the upward stroke in conducting; upbeat.
Compare thesis (def 4).
2.
Prosody.
  1. the part of a metrical foot that bears the ictus or stress.
  2. (less commonly) a part of a metrical foot that does not bear the ictus.
    Compare thesis (def 5).
Origin of arsis
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English: raising the voice < Latin < Greek, equivalent to ar- (stem of aírein to raise, lift) + -sis -sis
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for arsis
Historical Examples
  • Of the whole number, nine begin on the full bar, eleven on the arsis.

    The Central Eskimo Franz Boas
  • With arsis monosyllabic, the strong tendency is to make the thesis short.

    English Verse Raymond MacDonald Alden, Ph.D.
  • The syllable which receives the ictus is called the thesis; the rest of the foot is called the arsis.

    New Latin Grammar Charles E. Bennett
  • All of these unaccented syllables are reckoned together as one thesis, as against the accented syllable or arsis.

  • Examples of resolution of the first arsis are very numerous, cninga wldor El.

  • Examples of the resolution of the second arsis are less numerous, as wldor cninge El.

  • The sub-type A3 is type A with alliteration on the second arsis only and is limited almost entirely to the first hemistich.

  • A strengthened thesis occurs only after the second arsis; this sub-type might therefore be designated A3b.

  • When however it does occur, one of the three conditions under which a final syllable can take an arsis must accompany it.

    The English Language Robert Gordon Latham
  • The chief variations arise from resolution of the first arsis, cning lmhtig El.

British Dictionary definitions for arsis

arsis

/ˈɑːsɪs/
noun (pl) -ses (-siːz)
1.
(in classical prosody) the long syllable or part on which the ictus falls in a metrical foot Compare thesis (sense 6)
Word Origin
C18: via Late Latin from Greek, from airein to raise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for arsis

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for arsis

5
5
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for arsis