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attending

[uh-ten-ding] /əˈtɛn dɪŋ/
adjective, (of a physician)
1.
having primary responsibility for a patient.
2.
holding a staff position in an accredited hospital.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; attend + -ing2
Related forms
well-attending, adjective

attend

[uh-tend] /əˈtɛnd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to be present at:
to attend a lecture; to attend church.
2.
to go with as a concomitant or result; accompany:
Fever may attend a cold. Success attended her hard work.
3.
to take care of; minister to; devote one's services to:
The nurse attended the patient daily.
4.
to wait upon; accompany as a companion or servant:
The retainers attended their lord.
5.
to take charge of; watch over; look after; tend; guard:
to attend one's health.
6.
to listen to; give heed to.
7.
Archaic. to wait for; expect.
verb (used without object)
8.
to take care or charge:
to attend to a sick person.
9.
to apply oneself:
to attend to one's work.
10.
to pay attention; listen or watch attentively; direct one's thought; pay heed:
to attend to a speaker.
11.
to be present:
She is a member but does not attend regularly.
12.
to be present and ready to give service; wait (usually followed by on or upon):
to attend upon the Queen.
13.
to follow; be consequent (usually followed by on or upon).
14.
Obsolete. to wait.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English atenden < Anglo-French, Old French atendre < Latin attendere to bend to, notice. See at-, tend1
Related forms
attender, noun
attendingly, adverb
well-attended, adjective
Synonyms
4. See accompany.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for attending
  • By attending a nursery event, you may be selected to participate in a model design program.
  • It is important to note that the benefits of attending college are found both across and within professions.
  • Qualifying veterans receive an amount equal to the cost of attending an in-state, public four-year college.
  • Two of them are pretty obvious and completely unoriginal: correcting papers and attending department meetings.
  • In particular, it would keep certain lawfully present immigrants from attending public universities.
  • Alternative arrangements will be provided for candidates not attending the convention.
  • To make up for financial shortfalls elsewhere, students are likely to work more hours while attending college.
  • In fact, attending carefully to one event may actually make us less conscious of the rest of the world.
  • If so, you might want to brush up on royal protocol when you're attending his majesty at court.
  • Diet, aside from attending to the obvious issues, is laughable.
British Dictionary definitions for attending

attend

/əˈtɛnd/
verb
1.
to be present at (an event, meeting, etc)
2.
when intr, foll by to. to give care; minister
3.
when intr, foll by to. to pay attention; listen
4.
(transitive; often passive) to accompany or follow a high temperature attended by a severe cough
5.
(intransitive; foll by on or upon) to follow as a consequence (of)
6.
(intransitive) foll by to. to devote one's time; apply oneself to attend to the garden
7.
(transitive) to escort or accompany
8.
(intransitive; foll by on or upon) to wait (on); serve; provide for the needs (of) to attend on a guest
9.
(transitive) (archaic) to wait for; expect
10.
(intransitive) (obsolete) to delay
Derived Forms
attender, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French atendre, from Latin attendere to stretch towards, from tendere to extend
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for attending
attend
c.1300, "to direct one's mind or energies," from O.Fr. atendre (12c., Mod.Fr. attendre) "to expect, wait for, pay attention," from L. attendere "give heed to," lit. "to stretch toward," from ad- "to" + tendere "stretch" (see tenet). The notion is of "stretching" one's mind toward something. Sense of "take care of, wait upon" is from early 15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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