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Denotation vs. Connotation

avowed

[uh-voud] /əˈvaʊd/
adjective
1.
acknowledged; declared:
an avowed enemy.
Origin of avowed
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English; see avow, -ed2
Related forms
avowedly
[uh-vou-id-lee] /əˈvaʊ ɪd li/ (Show IPA),
adverb
avowedness, noun
self-avowed, adjective
unavowed, adjective

avow

[uh-vou] /əˈvaʊ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to declare frankly or openly; own; acknowledge; confess; admit:
He avowed himself an opponent of all alliances.
Origin
1150-1200; Middle English avowen < Old French avoue(r) < Latin advocāre. See advocate
Related forms
avowable, adjective
avower, noun
reavow, verb (used with object)
unavowable, adjective
unavowableness, noun
unavowably, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for avowed
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • These men, christened "Copperheads," became more odious to loyal Northerners than were the avowed Secessionists.

    Abraham Lincoln, Vol. II John T. Morse
  • Nor were they wrong, for such is the avowed aim of the "Forward Policy."

    The Story of the Malakand Field Force Sir Winston S. Churchill
  • Olga was an avowed Anarchist; she was almost a prisoner in the house of her uncle.

    Truxton King George Barr McCutcheon
  • He avowed his love for Agnes, and their intention to abide Sir Charles' decision.

    Oswald Langdon Carson Jay Lee
  • Eppie, like the ascendant race again, made prompt and shameless use of the avowed and very apparent weakness.

    The Shadow of Life Anne Douglas Sedgwick
British Dictionary definitions for avowed

avow

/əˈvaʊ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to state or affirm
2.
to admit openly
3.
(law, rare) to justify or maintain (some action taken)
Derived Forms
avowable, adjective
avowal, noun
avowed (əˈvaʊd) adjective
avowedly (əˈvaʊɪdlɪ) adverb
avower, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French avouer to confess, from Latin advocāre to appeal to, call upon; see avouch, advocate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for avowed

avow

v.

early 13c., from Anglo-French avouer, Old French avoer "acknowledge, accept, recognize," especially as a protector (Modern French avouer), from Latin advocare (see advocate). A synonym of avouch (q.v.), which tends to contain the more technical, legal aspect of the word. Related: Avowed; avowing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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