barbaric

[bahr-bar-ik]
adjective
1.
without civilizing influences; uncivilized; primitive: barbaric invaders.
2.
of, like, or befitting barbarians: a barbaric empire; barbaric practices.
3.
crudely rich or splendid: barbaric decorations.

Origin:
1480–90; < Latin barbaricus < Greek barbarikós. See barbarous, -ic

barbarically, adverb
nonbarbaric, adjective
prebarbaric, adjective


1, 3. See barbarian.
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World English Dictionary
barbaric (bɑːˈbærɪk)
 
adj
1.  of or characteristic of barbarians
2.  primitive or unsophisticated; unrestrained
3.  brutal
 
[C15: from Latin barbaricus foreign, outlandish; see barbarous]
 
bar'barically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

barbaric
late 15c., "barbarous," from Fr. barbarique (15c.), from L. barbaricus "foreign, strange, outlandish," from Gk. barbarikos "like a foreigner," from barbaros "foreign, rude" (see barbarian).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The hubbub simply illustrates the sports community's denial about the barbaric
  nature of boxing.
Actions deemed odd, psychotic or even barbaric by one culture may be perfectly
  acceptable to another.
Click through the gallery for the first scenes from this barbaric event.
If you engage with barbarians on the other side then one inevitably becomes
  barbaric.
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