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basting1

[bey-sting] /ˈbeɪ stɪŋ/
noun
1.
sewing with long, loose stitches to hold material in place until the final sewing.
2.
bastings, the stitches taken or the threads used.
Origin
1515-1525
1515-25; baste1 + -ing1

basting2

[bey-sting] /ˈbeɪ stɪŋ/
noun
1.
the act of moistening food while cooking, especially with stock or pan juices.
2.
the liquid used in basting.
Origin
1520-30; baste2 + -ing1

baste1

[beyst] /beɪst/
verb (used with object), basted, basting.
1.
to sew with long, loose stitches, as in temporarily tacking together pieces of a garment while it is being made.
Origin
1400-50; late Middle English basten < Anglo-French, Middle French bastir to build, baste < Germanic; compare Old High German bestan to mend, patch for *bastian to bring together with bast thread or string (bast bast + -i- v. suffix + -an infinitive suffix)

baste2

[beyst] /beɪst/
verb (used with object), basted, basting.
1.
to moisten (meat or other food) while cooking, with drippings, butter, etc.
noun
2.
liquid used to moisten and flavor food during cooking:
a baste of sherry and pan juices.
Origin
1425-75; late Middle English basten, of obscure origin

baste3

[beyst] /beɪst/
verb (used with object), basted, basting.
1.
to beat with a stick; thrash; cudgel.
2.
to denounce or scold vigorously:
an editorial basting the candidate for irresponsible statements.
Origin
1525-35; variant of baist, perhaps < Old Norse beysta to beat, thrash
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for basting
  • Don't forget to pack a heatproof brush for basting the chicken, too.
  • We tried stuffing butter under the skin or leaving it out, basting and not basting, varying the heat versus keeping it steady.
  • Some pros recommend basting the whites with fat from the pan to help cook them through.
  • Continue basting every ten minutes until chicken is cooked.
  • Bake one hour in hot oven, basting as soon as fat is tried out, and continue basting every ten minutes.
  • Bake thirty minutes in a hot oven, basting every five minutes with one-fourth cup butter melted in one-fourth cup boiling water.
  • Bake twenty minutes in hot oven, basting after well risen, with some of the fat from pan in which meat is roasting.
  • For basting use one-half cup butter melted in one-half cup boiling water and after this is used baste with fat in pan.
  • Bake in a hot oven until well browned, basting every four minutes with two tablespoons butter, melted in one-fourth cup water.
  • Bake in hot oven one and one-fourth hours, basting every fifteen minutes.
British Dictionary definitions for basting

basting

/ˈbeɪstɪŋ/
noun
1.
loose temporary stitches; tacking
2.
sewing with such stitches

baste1

/beɪst/
verb
1.
(transitive) to sew with loose temporary stitches
Word Origin
C14: from Old French bastir to build, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German besten to sew with bast

baste2

/beɪst/
verb
1.
to moisten (meat) during cooking with hot fat and the juices produced
Word Origin
C15: of uncertain origin

baste3

/beɪst/
verb
1.
(transitive) to beat thoroughly; thrash
Word Origin
C16: probably from Old Norse beysta
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for basting

baste

v.

"sew together loosely," c.1400, from Old French bastir "build, construct, sew up (a garment), baste, make, prepare, arrange" (12c., Modern French bâtir "to build"), probably from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *bastjan "join together with bast" (cf. Old High German besten; see bast).

"to soak in gravy, moisten," late 14c., of unknown origin, possibly from Old French basser "to moisten, soak," from bassin "basin" (see basin). Related: Basted; basting.

"beat, thrash," 1530s, perhaps from the cookery sense of baste (v.2) or from some Scandinavian source (e.g. Swedish basa "to beat, flog," bösta "to thump") akin to Old Norse beysta "to beat," and related to Old English beatan (see beat (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for basting

baste

verb

To strike violently and repeatedly: he basted the dog after it misbehaved (1530s+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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