follow Dictionary.com

Get the details behind our redesign

bedraggled

[bih-drag-uh ld] /bɪˈdræg əld/
adjective
1.
limp and soiled, as with rain or dirt.
Origin
Related forms
unbedraggled, adjective

bedraggle

[bih-drag-uh l] /bɪˈdræg əl/
verb (used with object), bedraggled, bedraggling.
1.
to make limp and soiled, as with rain or dirt.
Origin
1720-30; be- + draggle
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for bedraggled
  • The emergency rooms of this bedraggled region are facing their own emergency.
  • Newspapers across the country published pictures of one of its cars being towed to a dealer by four bedraggled horses.
  • Gold discovered at those sites over a century ago transformed bedraggled prospectors into instant millionaires.
  • His resignation leaves the coalition even more bedraggled.
  • The three are starving, bedraggled and wracked by tropical fevers.
  • For all the bedraggled look of the mattress-and-sleeping-bag-strewn camp, it has a structure and routine.
  • We were superficially bedraggled but fundamentally sturdy.
  • By the time she emerged, bedraggled but clear-headed, she knew what to do: make a sitcom about being fat.
  • Nonetheless, he cautioned that lower rates might not be able to ease the problems in the bedraggled credit markets.
  • There are photographs of dapper poseurs as well as skinny yeshiva boys, vacation revelers as well as bedraggled water-carriers.
British Dictionary definitions for bedraggled

bedraggled

/bɪˈdræɡəld/
adjective
1.
(of hair, clothing, etc) limp, untidy, or dirty, as with rain or mud

bedraggle

/bɪˈdræɡəl/
verb
1.
(transitive) to make (hair, clothing, etc) limp, untidy, or dirty, as with rain or mud
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for bedraggled
bedraggle
1727, from be- + draggle, frequentative of drag.
bedraggled
1727, p.p. adj. from bedraggle.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Word Value for bedraggled

16
20
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with bedraggled