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blare

[blair] /blɛər/
verb (used without object), blared, blaring.
1.
to emit a loud, raucous sound:
The trumpets blared as the procession got under way.
verb (used with object), blared, blaring.
2.
to sound loudly; proclaim noisily:
We sat there horrified as the radio blared the awful news.
noun
3.
a loud, raucous noise:
The blare of the band made conversation impossible.
4.
glaring intensity of light or color:
A blare of sunlight flooded the room as she opened the shutters.
5.
fanfare; flourish; ostentation; flamboyance:
a new breakfast cereal proclaimed with all the blare of a Hollywood spectacle.
6.
Eastern New England. the bawl of a calf.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English bleren; akin to Middle Dutch blaren, Middle Low German blarren, Middle High German blerren (German plärren)
Synonyms
1, 3. blast, bellow, roar, clang, clamor; screech, honk.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for blared
  • She pressed play on a tape recorder and the sound of traffic blared out of the little speakers.
  • Rock music blared from a transistor radio by a rusty cash register.
  • Loudspeakers blared a warning not to run the rogue program, but it was too late.
  • Horns blared as if a bevy of car alarms were stuck on insanity.
  • The bomber's name is blared from loudspeakers of mosques, the family elevated to celebrity status.
  • Now the bugle blared and the company was fully roused.
  • Between the demonstrable gas reserves, and the potential resources blared in the headlines, lies an enormous gulf of uncertainty.
  • Horns blared and thick blue exhaust clouded the air.
British Dictionary definitions for blared

blare

/blɛə/
verb
1.
to sound loudly and harshly
2.
to proclaim loudly and sensationally
noun
3.
a loud and usually harsh or grating noise
Word Origin
C14: from Middle Dutch bleren; of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for blared

blare

v.

late 14c., bleren "to wail," possibly from an unrecorded Old English *blæren, or from Middle Dutch bleren "to bleat, cry, bawl, shout." Probably echoic, either way. Related: Blared; blaring. As a noun from 1809, from the verb.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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9
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