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Denotation vs. Connotation

brute1

[broot] /brut/
noun
1.
a nonhuman creature; beast.
2.
a brutal, insensitive, or crude person.
3.
the animal qualities, desires, etc., of humankind:
Father felt that rough games brought out the brute in us.
adjective
4.
animal; not human.
5.
not characterized by intelligence or reason; irrational.
6.
characteristic of animals; of brutal character or quality.
7.
savage; cruel:
brute force.
8.
carnal; sensual.
Origin of brute1
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin brūtus heavy, devoid of feeling, irrational
Related forms
brutelike, adjective
brutely, adverb
bruteness, noun
Synonyms
1. See animal.

brute2

[broot] /brut/
verb (used with object), bruted, bruting.
1.
to shape (a diamond) by rubbing with another diamond or a diamond chip.
Origin
back formation from bruting a rough hewing (of a diamond), partial translation of French brutage literally, a roughing, equivalent to brut rough, raw (see brute1) + -age -age

et tu, Brute

[et too broo-tey] /ɛt ˈtu ˈbru teɪ/
Latin.
1.
and thou, Brutus!: alleged dying words of Julius Caesar uttered as his friend Brutus stabbed him.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for brute
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Well may the British mother tremble at the horrid sound, and pity the wretched Israelitish female, thus sunk below the brute.

  • The very drunk have the intuition sometimes of savages or brute beasts.

    K Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • Uttering the curious sound peculiar to grizzlies, the brute made as though it would approach still closer.

    Brave and True George Manville Fenn
  • From brute beasts you have restored us to the condition of men again.

    Tanglewood Tales Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Whoever was able to know Rolland's inmost essence, acquired, as in the ancient saga, new energy for the wrestle with brute force.

    Romain Rolland Stefan Zweig
British Dictionary definitions for brute

brute

/bruːt/
noun
1.
  1. any animal except man; beast; lower animal
  2. (as modifier): brute nature
2.
a brutal person
adjective (prenominal)
3.
wholly instinctive or physical (esp in the phrases brute strength, brute force)
4.
without reason or intelligence
5.
coarse and grossly sensual
Word Origin
C15: from Latin brūtus heavy, irrational; related to gravis heavy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for brute
adj.

early 15c., "of or belonging to animals," from Middle French brut "coarse, brutal, raw, crude," from Latin brutus "heavy, dull, stupid," an Oscan word, from PIE root *gwere- "heavy" (see grave (adj.)). Before reaching English the meaning expanded to "of the lower animals." Used of human beings from 1530s.

n.

1610s, from brute (adj.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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