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Denotation vs. Connotation

brutish

[broo-tish] /ˈbru tɪʃ/
adjective
1.
brutal; cruel.
2.
gross; coarse.
3.
carnal; sensual.
5.
bestial; like an animal.
Origin of brutish
1485-1495
1485-95; brute1 + -ish1
Related forms
brutishly, adverb
brutishness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for brutish
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It came from all Paris, urged on by brutish fever, a hankering for death and blood.

  • Laziness, that brutish existence which had been his dream, proved his punishment.

    Therese Raquin Emile Zola
  • There were no divinety, but by reason of compassion; for revenges are brutish and mortall.

    Great Ralegh Hugh De Selincourt
  • Pluto listened, and his face grew hard, brutish in its sullen hate.

    The Bondwoman Marah Ellis Ryan
  • But one Wickedness that has led me as much as any, to all the rest, has been my brutish Drunkenness.

British Dictionary definitions for brutish

brutish

/ˈbruːtɪʃ/
adjective
1.
of, relating to, or resembling a brute or brutes; animal
2.
coarse; cruel; stupid
Derived Forms
brutishly, adverb
brutishness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for brutish
adj.

1530s, "pertaining to animals," from brute (n.) + -ish. In reference to human brutes, from 1550s. Related: Brutishly; brutishness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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12
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