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bug1

[buhg] /bʌg/
noun
1.
Also called true bug, hemipteran, hemipteron. a hemipterous insect.
2.
(loosely) any insect or insectlike invertebrate.
3.
Informal. any microorganism, especially a virus:
He was laid up for a week by an intestinal bug.
4.
Informal. a defect or imperfection, as in a mechanical device, computer program, or plan; glitch:
The test flight discovered the bugs in the new plane.
5.
Informal.
  1. a person who has a great enthusiasm for something; fan or hobbyist:
    a hi-fi bug.
  2. a craze or obsession:
    He's got the sports-car bug.
6.
Informal.
  1. a hidden microphone or other electronic eavesdropping device.
  2. any of various small mechanical or electrical gadgets, as one to influence a gambling device, give warning of an intruder, or indicate location.
7.
a mark, as an asterisk, that indicates a particular item, level, etc.
8.
Horse Racing. the five-pound weight allowance that can be claimed by an apprentice jockey.
9.
a telegraph key that automatically transmits a series of dots when moved to one side and one dash when moved to the other.
10.
Poker Slang. a joker that can be used only as an ace or as a wild card to fill a straight or a flush.
11.
Printing. a label printed on certain matter to indicate that it was produced by a union shop.
12.
any of various fishing plugs resembling an insect.
13.
Chiefly British. a bedbug.
verb (used with object), bugged, bugging. Informal.
14.
to install a secret listening device in (a room, building, etc.) or on (a telephone or other device):
The phone had been bugged.
15.
to bother; annoy; pester:
She's bugging him to get her into show business.
Verb phrases
16.
bug off, Slang. to leave or depart, especially rapidly:
I can't help you, so bug off.
17.
bug out, Slang. to flee in panic; show panic or alarm.
Idioms
18.
put a bug in someone's ear, to give someone a subtle suggestion; hint:
We put a bug in his ear about a new gymnasium.
Origin
1615-1625
1615-25; 1885-90 for def 4; 1910-15 for def 5a; 1915-20 for def 14; 1945-50 for def 15; earlier bugge beetle, apparently alteration of Middle English budde, Old English -budda beetle; sense “leave” obscurely related to other senses and perhaps of distinct orig.
Related forms
unbugged, adjective
Synonyms
15. nag, badger, harass, plague, needle.

bug2

[buhg] /bʌg/
noun, Obsolete
1.
a bogy; hobgoblin.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English bugge scarecrow, demon, perhaps < Welsh bwg ghost

Bug

[buhg; Polish, Russian book] /bʌg; Polish, Russian buk/
noun
1.
a river in E central Europe, rising in W Ukraine and forming part of the boundary between Poland and Ukraine, flowing NW to the Vistula River in Poland. 450 miles (725 km) long.
2.
a river in SW Ukraine flowing SE to the Dnieper estuary. About 530 miles (850 km) long.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for bug
  • The millennium computer bug is totally predictable in its timing, but completely unpredictable in its effects.
  • One thing computer programmers agree on is that there is no such thing as a bug-free piece of software.
  • There is no hole in a computer into which you can drop a bug.
  • And, he is the guy a bug calls when it needs an agent.
  • Bring you rod, bug spray and the best hiking boots you can afford and you will never be let down.
  • Here is a great video showing a fake bug circus that charges a phone.
  • We work from the text, and the author's experience is that of being a bug on the editorial wall.
  • Worry about bug bites can also wait for warmer weather.
  • Used to be if spies wanted to eavesdrop, they planted a bug.
  • It isn't a bug enough disadvantage to spend a ton of money going somewhere else, tho.
British Dictionary definitions for bug

bug1

/bʌɡ/
noun
1.
any insect of the order Hemiptera, esp any of the suborder Heteroptera, having piercing and sucking mouthparts specialized as a beak (rostrum) See also assassin bug, bedbug, chinch bug
2.
(mainly US & Canadian) any insect, such as the June bug or the Croton bug
3.
(informal)
  1. a microorganism, esp a bacterium, that produces disease
  2. a disease, esp a stomach infection, caused by a microorganism
4.
(informal) an obsessive idea, hobby, etc; craze (esp in the phrases get the bug, be bitten by the bug, the bug bites, etc)
5.
(informal) a person having such a craze; enthusiast
6.
(often pl) (informal) an error or fault, as in a machine or system, esp in a computer or computer program
7.
(informal) a concealed microphone used for recording conversations, as in spying
8.
(US) (in poker) a joker used as an ace or wild card to complete a straight or flush
verb (informal) bugs, bugging, bugged
9.
(transitive) to irritate; bother
10.
(transitive) to conceal a microphone in (a room, etc)
11.
(intransitive) (US) (of eyes) to protrude
See also bug out
Word Origin
C16: of uncertain origin; perhaps related to Old English budda beetle

bug2

/bʌɡ/
noun
1.
(obsolete) an evil spirit or spectre; hobgoblin
Word Origin
C14 bugge, perhaps from Middle Welsh bwg ghost. See also bugbear, bugaboo

bug3

/bʌɡ/
verb
1.
a past tense and past participle of big2

Bug

/Russian buk/
noun
1.
Also called Southern Bug. a river in E Europe, rising in W Ukraine and flowing southeast to the Dnieper estuary and the Black Sea. Length: 853 km (530 miles)
2.
Also called Western Bug. a river in E Europe, rising in SW Ukraine and flowing northwest to the River Vistula in Poland, forming part of the border between Poland and Ukraine. Length: 724 km (450 miles)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bug
n.

"insect," 1620s (earliest reference is to bedbugs), of unknown origin, probably but not certainly from or influenced by Middle English bugge "something frightening, scarecrow" (late 14c.), a meaning obsolete since the "insect" sense arose except in bugbear (1570s) and bugaboo (q.v.).

Probably connected with Scottish bogill "goblin, bugbear," or obsolete Welsh bwg "ghost, goblin" (cf. Welsh bwgwl "threat," earlier "fear," Middle Irish bocanách "supernatural being"). Some speculate that these words are from a root meaning "goat" (see buck (n.1)) and represent originally a goat-like spectre. Cf. also bogey (n.1) and German bögge, böggel-mann "goblin." Perhaps influenced in meaning by Old English -budda used in compounds for "beetle" (cf. Low German budde "louse, grub," Middle Low German buddech "thick, swollen").

In the United States bug is not confined, as in England, to the domestic pest, but is applied to all insects of the Coleoptera order, which includes what in this country are generally called beetles. [Farmer & Henley, "Dictionary of Slang and Colloquial English," 1912 abridged edition]
Meaning "defect in a machine" (1889) may have been coined c.1878 by Thomas Edison (perhaps with the notion of an insect getting into the works). Meaning "person obsessed by an idea" (e.g. firebug) is from 1841, perhaps from notion of persistence. Sense of "microbe, germ" is from 1919. Bugs "crazy" is from c.1900. Bug juice as a slang name for drink is from 1869, originally "bad whiskey." The 1811 slang dictionary has bug-hunter "an upholsterer." Bug-word "word or words meant to irritate and vex" is from 1560s.

v.

"to bulge, protrude," 1872, originally of eyes, perhaps from a humorous or dialect mispronunciation of bulge (v.). Related: Bugged; bugging. As an adjective, bug-eyed recorded from 1872; so commonly used of space creatures in mid-20c. science fiction that the initialism BEM for bug-eyed monster was current by 1953.

"to annoy, irritate," 1949, probably from bug (n.) and a reference to insect pests. Sense of "equip with a concealed microphone" is from 1919. Related: Bugged; bugging.

"to scram, skedaddle," 1953, of uncertain origin, perhaps related to bug (v.2), and cf. bug off.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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bug in Medicine

bug (bŭg)
n.

  1. A true bug, specifically one having a beaklike structure that allows piercing and sucking.

  2. An insect or similar organism, such as a centipede or an earwig.

  3. A disease-producing microorganism, such as a flu bug.

  4. The illness or disease so produced.

  5. A defect or difficulty, as in a system or design.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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bug in Science
bug
  (bŭg)   
  1. An insect belonging to the suborder Heteroptera. See more at true bug.

  2. An insect, spider, or similar organism. Not in scientific use.


Our Living Language  : The word bug is often used to refer to tiny creatures that crawl along, such as insects and even small animals that are not insects, such as spiders and millipedes. But for scientists the word has a much narrower meaning. In the strictest terms bugs are those insects that have mouthparts adapted for piercing and sucking. The mouthparts of these bugs are contained in a beak-shaped structure. Thus scientists would classify a louse but not a beetle or a cockroach as a bug. In fact, scientists often call lice and their relatives true bugs to distinguish them better from what everyone else calls "bugs."
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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bug in Culture

bug definition


A generic term that describes a malfunction of undetermined origin in a computer or other electronic device.

Note: The term originated in the 1940s when the examination of a large computer revealed that an actual insect had landed on one of the circuits, shorting it out and shutting the machine down.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for bug

bug 2

verb

To protrude; bulge: Her eyes bugged out when she saw the bill

[1870s+ Dialect; fr humorous or dialectal pronunciation of bulge]


bug 1

noun
  1. Any insect whatever Now US only (1642+ British)
  2. Any upper-respiratory or flulike complaint, esp one that is somewhat prevalent: There's a bug going around (1960s+)
  3. Any fault or defect in a machine, plans, system, etc: You've got to get the bugs out of the program before trying to run it on the computer (1870s+)
  4. Any small, cheap item sold by a vendor or huckster (1800s+ Circus & carnival)
  5. A joker or a wild card (1940s+ Poker)
  6. A girl: Boys prowl for ''bugs'' (1960s+ Teenagers)
  7. A semiautomatic or automatic radiotelegraph key used for fast sending (1920s+ Radio operators)
  8. Any small symbol or label, such as a copyright or trademark symbol (1950s+ Print shop)
  9. An asterisk printed beside the weight a horse is to carry, showing that a five-pound decrease has been granted because the jockey is an apprentice (1940s+ Horse racing)
  10. An apprentice jockey who has ridden his or her maiden race during the current year or has not yet won his or her fortieth race (1940s+ Horse racing)
  11. A horse that has never won a race; maiden (1940s+ Horse racing)
  12. A hot rod (1950s+ Hot rodders)
  13. A small foreign car, esp the Volkswagen Beetle2 (1919+)
  14. A small two-person lunar excursion vehicle (1960s+ Astronautics)
  15. An enthusiast; devotee; hobbyist; fan, nut: Momma's a football bug (1841+)
  16. A compelling idea or interest: His bug is surf-casting (1900+)
  17. An insane person; nut: Only a bug is strong enough for that (1880s+)
  18. An irrational, touchy mood; bad mood (1930s+ Prison)
  19. A psychiatrist (1950s+ Prison)
  20. A confidential message or signal; confidential information (1925+ Underworld)
  21. A burglar alarm (1920s+ Underworld)
  22. Small hidden listening devices for surveillance: The team planted bugs in about six flowerpots (1940s+)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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bug in Technology

programming
An unwanted and unintended property of a program or piece of hardware, especially one that causes it to malfunction. Antonym of feature. E.g. "There's a bug in the editor: it writes things out backward." The identification and removal of bugs in a program is called "debugging".
Admiral Grace Hopper (an early computing pioneer better known for inventing COBOL) liked to tell a story in which a technician solved a glitch in the Harvard Mark II machine by pulling an actual insect out from between the contacts of one of its relays, and she subsequently promulgated bug in its hackish sense as a joke about the incident (though, as she was careful to admit, she was not there when it happened). For many years the logbook associated with the incident and the actual bug in question (a moth) sat in a display case at the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC). The entire story, with a picture of the logbook and the moth taped into it, is recorded in the "Annals of the History of Computing", Vol. 3, No. 3 (July 1981), pp. 285--286.
The text of the log entry (from September 9, 1947), reads "1545 Relay #70 Panel F (moth) in relay. First actual case of bug being found". This wording establishes that the term was already in use at the time in its current specific sense - and Hopper herself reports that the term "bug" was regularly applied to problems in radar electronics during WWII.
Indeed, the use of "bug" to mean an industrial defect was already established in Thomas Edison's time, and a more specific and rather modern use can be found in an electrical handbook from 1896 ("Hawkin's New Catechism of Electricity", Theo. Audel & Co.) which says: "The term "bug" is used to a limited extent to designate any fault or trouble in the connections or working of electric apparatus." It further notes that the term is "said to have originated in quadruplex telegraphy and have been transferred to all electric apparatus."
The latter observation may explain a common folk etymology of the term; that it came from telephone company usage, in which "bugs in a telephone cable" were blamed for noisy lines. Though this derivation seems to be mistaken, it may well be a distorted memory of a joke first current among *telegraph* operators more than a century ago!
Actually, use of "bug" in the general sense of a disruptive event goes back to Shakespeare! In the first edition of Samuel Johnson's dictionary one meaning of "bug" is "A frightful object; a walking spectre"; this is traced to "bugbear", a Welsh term for a variety of mythological monster which (to complete the circle) has recently been reintroduced into the popular lexicon through fantasy role-playing games.
In any case, in jargon the word almost never refers to insects. Here is a plausible conversation that never actually happened:
"There is a bug in this ant farm!"
"What do you mean? I don't see any ants in it."
"That's the bug."
[There has been a widespread myth that the original bug was moved to the Smithsonian, and an earlier version of this entry so asserted. A correspondent who thought to check discovered that the bug was not there. While investigating this in late 1990, your editor discovered that the NSWC still had the bug, but had unsuccessfully tried to get the Smithsonian to accept it - and that the present curator of their History of American Technology Museum didn't know this and agreed that it would make a worthwhile exhibit. It was moved to the Smithsonian in mid-1991, but due to space and money constraints has not yet been exhibited. Thus, the process of investigating the original-computer-bug bug fixed it in an entirely unexpected way, by making the myth true! - ESR]
[Jargon File]
(1999-06-29)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Idioms and Phrases with bug
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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