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pester

[pes-ter] /ˈpɛs tər/
verb (used with object)
1.
to bother persistently with petty annoyances; trouble:
Don't pester me with your trivial problems.
2.
Obsolete. to overcrowd.
Origin
1530-1540
1530-40; perhaps aphetic variant of empester, impester to tangle, encumber (though pester is found earlier than these 2 words) < Middle French empestrer to hobble, entangle < Vulgar Latin *impāstōriāre to hobble, equivalent to im- im-1 + pāstōri(a) a hobble, noun use of Latin pāstōrius of a herdsman or shepherd + -āre infinitive suffix (see pastor); aphetic form apparently reinforced by pest (cf. -er6)
Related forms
pesterer, noun
pesteringly, adverb
pestersome, adjective
unpestered, adjective
Synonyms
1. annoy, vex, tease, disturb; irritate, provoke, plague; badger, harry, hector.
Antonyms
1. delight, entertain.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for pester
  • Don't pester them, but also don't hesitate to ask them for information on the review process.
  • There is only one reason why they are there: to get kids to pester their parents for the meals.
  • It's not enough for people to pester your boss for free tickets.
  • She didn't pester one with exercises, didn't exact hours of practice.
  • We've put together a quick and easy set of questions to gently pester post office patrons with as they exit the building.
  • When it's your own dog, the dog will pester you until you take it for a walk.
  • Obviously if you pester people they will get defensive.
  • After submitting a complaint, users will get a tracking number, so they can pester city officials if the problem persists.
British Dictionary definitions for pester

pester

/ˈpɛstə/
verb
1.
(transitive) to annoy or nag continually
Derived Forms
pesterer, noun
pesteringly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Old French empestrer to hobble (a horse), from Vulgar Latin impāstōriāre (unattested) to use a hobble, from pāstōria (unattested) a hobble, from Latin pāstōrius relating to a herdsman, from pastor herdsman
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pester
pester
1524, "to clog, entangle, encumber," probably aphetic of M.Fr. empestrer "place in an embarrassing situation" (Fr. empêtrer, Walloon epasturer), from V.L. *impastoriare "to hobble" (an animal), from L. im- "in" + M.L. pastoria (chorda) "rope to hobble an animal," noun use of L. pastoria, fem. of pastorius "of a herdsman," from pastor "herdsman," from pascere "to graze." Sense of "annoy, trouble" (1562) is from influence of pest (q.v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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