building

[bil-ding]
noun
1.
a relatively permanent enclosed construction over a plot of land, having a roof and usually windows and often more than one level, used for any of a wide variety of activities, as living, entertaining, or manufacturing.
2.
anything built or constructed.
3.
the act, business, or practice of constructing houses, office buildings, etc.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English byldinge. See build, -ing1

buildingless, adjective
underbuilding, noun


1. Building, edifice, structure refer to something built. Building and structure may apply to either a finished or an unfinished product of construction, and carry no implications as to size or condition. Edifice is a more formal word and narrower in application, referring to a completed structure, and usually a large and imposing one. Building generally connotes a useful purpose (houses, schools, business offices, etc.); structure suggests the planning and constructive process.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

build

[bild]
verb (used with object), built or (Archaic) builded; building.
1.
to construct (especially something complex) by assembling and joining parts or materials: to build a house.
2.
to establish, increase, or strengthen (often followed by up ): to build a business; to build up one's hopes.
3.
to mold, form, or create: to build boys into men.
4.
to base; found: a relationship built on trust.
5.
Games.
a.
to make (words) from letters.
b.
to assemble (cards) according to number, suit, etc., as in melding.
verb (used without object), built or (Archaic) builded; building.
6.
to engage in the art, practice, or business of building.
7.
to form or construct a plan, system of thought, etc. (usually followed by on or upon ): He built on the philosophies of the past.
8.
to increase or develop toward a maximum, as of intensity, tempo, or magnitude (often followed by up ): The drama builds steadily toward a climax.
noun
9.
the physical structure, especially of a person; physique; figure: He had a strong build.
10.
the manner or form of construction: The house was of modern build.
11.
Computers.
a.
a version of a program after compilation, typically an update to an existing version made before the program is released.
b.
the process of producing a software build.
c.
a new version or update of data in a database or on a website: frequent, incremental builds of data.
12.
Masonry.
a.
a vertical joint.
b.
the vertical dimension of a stone laid on its bed.
Verb phrases
13.
build in/into, to build or incorporate as part of something else: to build in bookcases between the windows; an allowance for travel expenses built into the budget.
14.
build up,
a.
to develop or increase: to build up a bank account.
b.
to strengthen.
c.
to prepare in stages.
d.
to fill in with houses; develop into an urban area.
e.
to praise or flatter.

Origin:
before 1150; Middle English bilden, Old English byldan, derivative of bold, variant of botl dwelling, house

buildable, adjective
misbuild, verb, misbuilt, misbuilding.
outbuild, verb (used with object), outbuilt, outbuilding.
prebuild, verb (used with object), prebuilt, prebuilding.
superbuild, verb, superbuilt, superbuilding.
unbuildable, adjective
underbuild, verb, underbuilt, underbuilding.

billed, build.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To building
Collins
World English Dictionary
build (bɪld)
 
vb (foll by on or upon) (often foll by up) , builds, building, built
1.  to make, construct, or form by joining parts or materials: to build a house
2.  (intr) to be a builder by profession
3.  (tr) to order the building of: the government builds most of our hospitals
4.  to base; found: his theory was not built on facts
5.  (tr) to establish and develop: it took ten years to build a business
6.  (tr) to make in a particular way or for a particular purpose: the car was not built for speed
7.  to increase in intensity: the wind was building
8.  cards
 a.  to add cards to each other to form (a sequence or set)
 b.  (intr) to add to the layout of cards on the table from one's hand
 
n
9.  physical form, figure, or proportions: a man with an athletic build
 
[Old English byldan; related to bylda farmer, bold building, Old Norse bōl farm, dwelling; see bower1]

building (ˈbɪldɪŋ)
 
n
1.  something built with a roof and walls, such as a house or factory
2.  the act, business, occupation, or art of building houses, boats, etc

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

build
late O.E. byldan "construct a house," verb form of bold "house," from P.Gmc. *buthlam (cf. O.Fris. bodel "building, house"), from PIE *bhu- "to dwell," from base *bheue- "to be, exist, grow." Rare in O.E.; in M.E. it won out over more common O.E. timbran. Modern spelling is unexplained.

building
"a structure," c.1300, from prp. adj. of build.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Easton
Bible Dictionary

Building definition


among the Jews was suited to the climate and conditions of the country. They probably adopted the kind of architecture for their dwellings which they found already existing when they entered Canaan (Deut. 6:10; Num. 13:19). Phoenician artists (2 Sam. 5:11; 1 Kings 5:6, 18) assisted at the erection of the royal palace and the temple at Jerusalem. Foreigners also assisted at the restoration of the temple after the Exile (Ezra 3:7). In Gen. 11:3, 9, we have the first recorded instance of the erection of buildings. The cities of the plain of Shinar were founded by the descendants of Shem (10:11, 12, 22). The Israelites were by occupation shepherds and dwellers in tents (Gen. 47:3); but from the time of their entering Canaan they became dwellers in towns, and in houses built of the native limestone of Palestine. Much building was carried on in Solomon's time. Besides the buildings he completed at Jerusalem, he also built Baalath and Tadmor (1 Kings 9:15, 24). Many of the kings of Israel and Judah were engaged in erecting various buildings. Herod and his sons and successors restored the temple, and built fortifications and other structures of great magnificence in Jerusalem (Luke 21:5). The instruments used in building are mentioned as the plumb-line (Amos 7:7), the measuring-reed (Ezek. 40:3), and the saw (1 Kings 7:9). Believers are "God's building" (1 Cor. 3:9); and heaven is called "a building of God" (2 Cor. 5:1). Christ is the only foundation of his church (1 Cor. 3:10-12), of which he also is the builder (Matt. 16:18).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Construction of the building that will house the new college began last month.
The building was constructed so that students' rooms can be air-conditioned at
  some point in the future.
It constructed models of the building to give the subcontractors a chance to
  practice.
Building for the web today is a lot easier than it was before content
  management systems.
Images for building
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