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caning

[key-ning] /ˈkeɪ nɪŋ/
noun
1.
the act of providing chairs or the like with seats made of woven cane.
2.
woven cane for seats of chairs or the like.
3.
a beating with a cane.
Origin
1705-1715
1705-15; cane + -ing1

cane

[keyn] /keɪn/
noun
1.
a stick or short staff used to assist one in walking; walking stick.
2.
a long, hollow or pithy, jointed woody stem, as that of bamboo, rattan, sugar cane, and certain palms.
3.
a plant having such a stem.
4.
split rattan woven or interlaced for chair seats, wickerwork, etc.
5.
any of several tall bamboolike grasses, especially of the genus Arundinaria, as A. gigantea (cane reed, large cane, giant cane, or southern cane) and A. tecta (small cane or switch cane) of the southern U.S.
6.
the stem of a raspberry or blackberry.
8.
a rod used for flogging.
9.
a slender cylinder or rod, as of sealing wax or glass.
verb (used with object), caned, caning.
10.
to flog with a cane.
11.
to furnish or make with cane:
to cane chairs.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English < Middle French < Latin canna < Greek kánna < Semitic; compare Akkadian qanū, Hebrew qāneh reed
Related forms
canelike, adjective
cany, adjective
recane, verb (used with object), recaned, recaning.
uncaned, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for caning
  • Crafting their code in home workshops, they enjoyed the same satisfaction that comes from building a bookshelf or caning a chair.
  • So too are strict laws, with many crimes punishable by caning or hanging.
  • He was already between secondary school and university, and was too old for caning.
  • The caning officer delivers the strokes using the whole of his body weight.
  • The caning was carried out with a half-inch-thick wooden cane that could cause welts and scarring.
  • Reports were received during the year of the use of corporal punishment, including the caning of students.
  • caning, in addition to imprisonment, has been a routine punishment for numerous offenses.
  • Three-time offenders face long mandatory sentences and caning.
  • caning, carried out with a half-inch-thick wooden cane, commonly causes welts and at times scarring.
  • Chair caning and rush roping are also done in the upholstery shop.
British Dictionary definitions for caning

caning

/ˈkeɪnɪŋ/
noun
1.
a beating with a cane as a punishment
2.
(informal) a severe defeat

cane1

/keɪn/
noun
1.
  1. the long jointed pithy or hollow flexible stem of the bamboo, rattan, or any similar plant
  2. any plant having such a stem
2.
  1. strips of such stems, woven or interlaced to make wickerwork, the seats and backs of chairs, etc
  2. (as modifier): a cane chair
3.
the woody stem of a reed, young grapevine, blackberry, raspberry, or loganberry
4.
any of several grasses with long stiff stems, esp Arundinaria gigantea of the southeastern US
5.
a flexible rod with which to administer a beating as a punishment, as to schoolboys
6.
a slender rod, usually wooden and often ornamental, used for support when walking; walking stick
7.
8.
a slender rod or cylinder, as of glass
verb (transitive)
9.
to whip or beat with or as if with a cane
10.
to make or repair with cane
11.
(informal) to defeat: we got well caned in the match
12.
(slang) cane it, to do something with great power, force, or speed or consume something such as alcohol in large quantities: you can do it in ten minutes if you really cane it
Derived Forms
caner, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French, from Latin canna, from Greek kanna, of Semitic origin; related to Arabic qanāh reed

cane2

/keɪn/
noun
1.
(dialect) a female weasel
Word Origin
C18: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for caning

cane

n.

late 14c., from Old French cane "reed, cane, spear" (13c., Modern French canne), from Latin canna "reed, cane," from Greek kanna, perhaps from Assyrian qanu "tube, reed" (cf. Hebrew qaneh, Arabic qanah "reed"), from Sumerian gin "reed." But Tucker finds this borrowing "needless" and proposes a native Indo-European formation from a root meaning "to bind, bend." Sense of "walking stick" in English is 1580s.

v.

"to beat with a walking stick," 1660s, from cane (n.). Related: Caned; caning.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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caning in the Bible

a tall sedgy plant with a hollow stem, growing in moist places. In Isa. 43:24; Jer. 6:20, the Hebrew word _kaneh_ is thus rendered, giving its name to the plant. It is rendered "reed" in 1 Kings 14:15; Job 40:21; Isa. 19:6; 35:7. In Ps. 68:30 the expression "company of spearmen" is in the margin and the Revised Version "beasts of the reeds," referring probably to the crocodile or the hippopotamus as a symbol of Egypt. In 2 Kings 18:21; Isa. 36:6; Ezek. 29:6, 7, the reference is to the weak, fragile nature of the reed. (See CALAMUS.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Article for caning

a beating administered with a whip or rod, with blows commonly directed to the person's back. It was imposed as a form of judicial punishment and as a means of maintaining discipline in schools, prisons, military forces, and private homes.

Learn more about caning with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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9
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