cartilage

[kahr-tl-ij, kahrt-lij]
noun Anatomy, Zoology.
1.
a firm, elastic, flexible type of connective tissue of a translucent whitish or yellowish color; gristle.
2.
a part or structure composed of cartilage.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin cartilāgō gristle

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
cartilage (ˈkɑːtɪlɪdʒ, ˈkɑːtlɪdʒ)
 
n
Nontechnical name: gristle a tough elastic tissue composing most of the embryonic skeleton of vertebrates. In the adults of higher vertebrates it is mostly converted into bone, remaining only on the articulating ends of bones, in the thorax, trachea, nose, and ears
 
[C16: from Latin cartilāgō]
 
cartilaginous
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cartilage
1540s, from L. cartilago (gen. cartilaginis) "cartilage, gristle."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

cartilage car·ti·lage (kär'tl-ĭj)
n.
A tough, elastic, fibrous connective tissue that is a major constituent of embryonic and young vertebrate skeletons, is converted largely to bone with maturation, and is found in various parts of the adult body, such as the joints, outer ear, and larynx.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
cartilage   (kär'tl-ĭj)  Pronunciation Key 
A strong, flexible connective tissue that is found in various parts of the body, including the joints, the outer ear, and the larynx. During the embryonic development of most vertebrates, the skeleton forms as cartilage before most of it hardens into bone. In cartilaginous fish, the mature fish retains a skeleton made of cartilage.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
cartilage [(kahr-tl-ij)]

A kind of tough but elastic connective tissue that can withstand considerable pressure. It makes up portions of the skeletal system, such as the linings of the joints, where it cushions against shock. Cartilage is also found in other body structures, such as the nose and external ear.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
As a result, the bone beneath the cartilage changes and develops bony
  overgrowth.
In the ring digit, testosterone stimulates cell division, building up cartilage
  and bone to make the digit longer.
As anyone with cartilage damage from a sports injury knows, there's not a whole
  lot doctors can do to help.
Chimaeras have cartilage instead of bone for skeletons, as do sharks.
Image for cartilage
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