causative

[kaw-zuh-tiv]
adjective
1.
acting as a cause; producing (often followed by of ): a causative agency; an event causative of war.
2.
Grammar. noting causation. The causative form of to fall is to fell. Gothic -jan is a causative suffix in fulljan “to cause to be full; to fill.”
noun
3.
Grammar. a word, especially a verb, noting causation, as made in He made me eat the apple.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin causātīvus, equivalent to causāt(us) caused (see causation) + -īvus -ive

causatively, adverb
causativeness, causativity, noun
intercausative, adjective
noncausative, adjective
noncausatively, adverb
noncausativeness, noun
uncausative, adjective
uncausatively, adverb
uncausativeness, noun
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World English Dictionary
causative (ˈkɔːzətɪv)
 
adj (and foll by of)
1.  grammar relating to a form or class of verbs, such as persuade, that express causation
2.  producing an effect
 
n
3.  the causative form or class of verbs
 
'causatively
 
adv
 
'causativeness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

causative
c.1420, from Fr. causatif, from L. causativus, from causa (see cause).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The causative organism was not one they tested for routinely.
Correct pronunciation of the different diseases and causative agents also helps
  patients.
The presumption of guilt may be the causative behind severe tragedies, or the
  irony at the heart of distasteful fiascos.
Constructing a one-time ex post rationale is not a good way to view causative
  relations.
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