chastise

[chas-tahyz, chas-tahyz]
verb (used with object), chastised, chastising.
1.
to discipline, especially by corporal punishment.
2.
to criticize severely.
3.
Archaic. to restrain; chasten.
4.
Archaic. to refine; purify.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English chastisen, equivalent to chasti(en) to chasten + -s- < ? + -en infinitive suffix

chastisable, adjective
chastisement [chas-tiz-muhnt, chas-tahyz-] , noun
chastiser, noun
nonchastisement, noun
self-chastise, verb (used with object), self-chastised, self-chastising.
self-chastisement, noun
unchastisable, adjective
unchastised, adjective
unchastising, adjective


1. punish, castigate; whip, beat, flog, spank.
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World English Dictionary
chastise (tʃæsˈtaɪz)
 
vb
1.  to discipline or punish, esp by beating
2.  to scold severely
 
[C14 chastisen, irregularly from chastien to chasten]
 
chas'tisable
 
adj
 
chastisement
 
n
 
chas'tiser
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

chastise
British spelling of chastize (q.v.); for suffix, see -ize. Chastised is from c.1440; chastisement and chastising from c.1300.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Chastise him for implementing something other than what he indicated in his
  campaign.
Undiscerning, they chastise with scorpions the old authentic sins, but spare
  the new.
He hurries after the wrongdoer with lifted cane, in order to chastise him.
While a manager may swear and spit, kick dust all over umpires, rarely will
  they publicly chastise their ballplayers.
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