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chronicle

[kron-i-kuh l] /ˈkrɒn ɪ kəl/
noun
1.
a chronological record of events; a history.
verb (used with object), chronicled, chronicling.
2.
to record in or as in a chronicle.
Origin of chronicle
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English cronicle < Anglo-French, variant, with -le -ule, of Old French cronique < Medieval Latin cronica (feminine singular), Latin chronica (neuter plural) < Greek chroniká annals, chronology; see chronic
Related forms
chronicler, noun
unchronicled, adjective
Synonyms
2. recount, relate, narrate, report.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the web for chronicling
  • With a light touch and keen ear, she had spent decades chronicling the ambivalent desires of her self-absorbed cohort.
  • Linguists are chronicling how nomadic communication changes language itself, and thus thought.
  • Stay tuned for some posts chronicling my travels in the area.
  • We'll have coverage on our site throughout the day, chronicling the best games and the biggest upsets.
  • Models get ready backstage amid photographers who are chronicling the annual fashion event.
  • Challenges shape us, and those of us lucky enough to earn a living chronicling them are well served to live by that credo.
  • He is chronicling his search for a tenure-track position.
  • And the biographies were no dry-as-dust treatises, but best-selling books chronicling the exciting life of a philological genius.
  • The first half was especially fascinating, chronicling the rise of street art.
  • She has been chronicling her search for her first tenure-track job.
British Dictionary definitions for chronicling

chronicle

/ˈkrɒnɪkəl/
noun
1.
a record or register of events in chronological order
verb
2.
(transitive) to record in or as if in a chronicle
Derived Forms
chronicler, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-French cronicle, via Latin chronica (pl), from Greek khronika annals, from khronikos relating to time; see chronic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for chronicling

chronicle

n.

c.1300, cronicle, from Anglo-French cronicle, from Old French cronique "chronicle" (Modern French chronique), from Latin chronica (neuter plural mistaken for fem. singular), from Greek ta khronika (biblia) "the (books of) annals, chronology," neuter plural of khronikos "of time." Ending modified in Anglo-French, perhaps by influence of article. Old English had cranic "chronicle," cranicwritere "chronicler." The classical -h- was restored in English from 16c.

v.

c.1400, croniclen, from chronicle (n.). Related: Chronicled; chronicling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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